Voronoi a solid model

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Voronoi a solid model

NathanA
How would one go about creating something like this in openscad? http://www.voronator.com/. It takes any solid model and voronois it. 

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Voronoi a solid model

nophead
I don't think you can. You would need to start with a numerical model, not an STL file as you can only generate geometry in OpenScad, not query it.

On 26 April 2016 at 01:03, Nathan Apter <[hidden email]> wrote:
How would one go about creating something like this in openscad? http://www.voronator.com/. It takes any solid model and voronois it. 

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org



_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Voronoi a solid model

Neon22
There is a workflow - using the manifold lab tools - in Wings3D.
but as Nophead says - not possible in current openSCAD.


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Voronoi a solid model

wolf
I disagree - it ought to be possible to do it in OpenSCAD, but it would be a major effort.
The first step would be to get hold of the vertices and faces of the shape you want to voronoi. The .stl file contains the information, you would have to write the translator into a list intelligeble by OpenSCAD. Once you have that list. you can recreate your shape using polyhedron().
Since you now have the list of all vectors and faces, you can use Lloyd's algorithm (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd%27s_algorithm) to create new faces and voronoi to your heart's content.
It's a major effort, but - I would think - worth the time spent, as it allows the creation of porous objects, which is the area where 3D printing really excels in. Explore the website of http://uformia.com to see what is possible.
Visualise what it would mean for aircraft enthusiasts if they could print a wing or fuselage with a solid surface and a foam-like interior? How much rigidity would that add to their design, at how much weight? Ribs and struts are such poor replacements for an integral design . . .

wolf