Newbie Question

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Newbie Question

laakman
This post has NOT been accepted by the mailing list yet.
Trying to make one of these. Sleeve for a fountain pen. This is what I have so far and it doesn't have the taper, or the hollow part. Love learning, but kind of hit a wall. Here's my code so far: cylinder(h = 6, r1 = 7, r2 = 7); translate([0, 0, 6]) cylinder(h = 7.8, r = 8.5); translate([0, 0, 13.8]) cylinder(h = 12.5, r1 = 9.7, r2 = 9.1); difference() { cylinder(h = -27.3, r = 5, center = true); rotate([0, 0, -26.3]) cylinder(27.3, r = 5, center = true); }
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Re: Newbie Question

MichaelAtOz
Administrator
hi,

Welcome to the forum. Your post is still flagged as "This post has NOT been accepted by the mailing list yet", so nobody gets it unless they look. You need to subscribe to the mailing list, and respond to the registration email.

This should get you started, note it is good to overlap things you join by a small amount and similarly, if you difference() something you want them not to have the same face, hence the translate([0,0,-small]), so it punches through the bottom. (look at it without that too see).

small=0.01;
difference() {
        union() {
                cylinder(h = 6, r1 = 7, r2 = 7);
                translate([0, 0, 6-small]) cylinder(h = 7.8+small, r = 8.5);
                translate([0, 0, 13.8-small]) cylinder(h = 12.5, r1 = 9.7, r2 = 9.1);
        }
        // -
        translate([0,0,-small]) cylinder(27.3, r = 5);
}
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Re: Newbie Question

laakman
Not sure you got my last message.  Thanks for the quick-turn on it!
So now I need to add a taper to it, and I get the overlap so it's not printed in 3 sections, which would defeat the purpose of it being printed as a piece.
How do I scale it to be in milimeters?  This is a whole new world for me, but it's hard for me, because I'm not a math person.  This is where I pay for not being any good at math.
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Re: Newbie Question

MichaelAtOz
Administrator
laakman wrote
Not sure you got my last message.
Other than the one with the photo? No.
laakman wrote
So now I need to add a taper to it, and I get the overlap so it's not printed in 3 sections, which would defeat the purpose of it being printed as a piece.
How do I scale it to be in milimeters?
OpenSCAD is unit-less. It is the slicing software that translates unit-less measurements into the units of the printer. Most (?) operate in metric mm. So if you just use r=5 than will be a circle of 10mm.

Re taper, that will be fiddly to get such a smooth flat-j curve to that section. An approximation is possible like so: (I just guested at 8mm along for the skinny part)

$fn=64;
small=0.01;
difference() {
        union() {
                cylinder(h = 6, r1 = 7, r2 = 7);
                translate([0, 0, 6-small]) cylinder(h = 7.8+small, r = 8.5);
                // approximate taper
                translate([0, 0, 13.8-small]) cylinder(h = 8+small, r = 9.7, r2=9.1); // was h=12.
                translate([0, 0, 13.8+8-small]) cylinder(h=1+small, r = 9.1);
                translate([0, 0, 13.8+8+1-small]) cylinder(h=4+small, r= 9.1, r2=9.7);
        }
        // -
        translate([0,0,-small]) cylinder(27.3, r = 5);
}

I hope you have a very good quality printer, in my experience such small things don't come out so good.
Admin - email* me if you need anything,
or if I've done something stupid...
* click on my MichaelAtOz label, there is a link to email me.

Unless specifically shown otherwise above, my contribution is in the Public Domain; to the extent possible under law, I have waived all copyright and related or neighbouring rights to this work.
Obviously inclusion of works of previous authors is not included in the above.


The TPP is no simple “trade agreement.” Fight it! http://www.ourfairdeal.org/ time is running out!
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Re: Newbie Question

laakman
Wow, I'm really, really new at this stuff.  Thanks a million for the help.  Is there a way to import this into a different CAD to mess with?
But you make it look so easy.
I have a FlashForge Dreamer, it is supposed to have a decent resolution for it.  Haven't printed with it yet, because Santa Claus hasn't officially delivered it.  But it's here.
I have it also listed on Thingiverse and there's been some help on there with it.  
Yes, the next step as I understand is slicing.  What does that do?  Is that the final look and then you save it as a g file or something.

I really need adult supervision on this!  This is what happens when you let people with liberal arts degrees gain access to technology.  It just slows everyone else down.

J

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Re: Newbie Question

Neon22
@laakman,  You can export as an stl or obj - which turns the object into a polygonal approximation. These two file formats are the most commonly read. OBJ is probably the most common but 3D printer slicers usually prefer STL files. CAD editors usually keep the files in solids form but you probably want a polygonal editor to do further work and not a CAD based editor. YMMV.

Then you could edit it further in all kinds of polygonal editing programs. (such as Blender, Wings3D, very large number of these).
Then re-export as an STL to send to the slicing program associated with your printer.
I use Repetier - which uses Slic3r(default) or Cura or Skeinforge as the slicing engines.
These generate gcode which controls the actual printer by making it move in lines and arcs while extruding (occasionally).
There are several variants of g-code - different machines support different sets of codes but there is a common set which works pretty well across the board.
All slicers have to be setup for specific sized XYZ ranges, speeds, rates etc.
Your printer will have this info and a preferred slicer. Start with that until you're really comfortable to change it completely.... as usual YMMV
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Re: Newbie Question

MichaelAtOz
Administrator
In reply to this post by laakman
I'd suggest you may want to print some calibration objects first.
Admin - email* me if you need anything,
or if I've done something stupid...
* click on my MichaelAtOz label, there is a link to email me.

Unless specifically shown otherwise above, my contribution is in the Public Domain; to the extent possible under law, I have waived all copyright and related or neighbouring rights to this work.
Obviously inclusion of works of previous authors is not included in the above.


The TPP is no simple “trade agreement.” Fight it! http://www.ourfairdeal.org/ time is running out!