Lathe tutorial?

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
10 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Lathe tutorial?

jem1098
Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.

So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."

thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.

Joe Meyer




_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

Drew Rogge
Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.

Drew

On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:

> Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
> I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>
> So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>
> thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>
> Joe Meyer
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

nophead
I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.

On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email]> wrote:
Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.

Drew

On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
> Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
> I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>
> So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>
> thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>
> Joe Meyer
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

alexgibson
Dropping into this...

I am interested in driving a lathe with profiles from openscad - I thought of doing a minkowski sum of my 2d profile shape and a series of  increasingly large circles... 

Does this sound useful as a plan?

Cheers
Alex Gibson

Sent from my iPhone

On 31 Oct 2014, at 11:36, nop head <[hidden email]> wrote:

I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.

On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email]> wrote:
Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.

Drew

On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
> Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
> I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>
> So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>
> thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>
> Joe Meyer
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

jem1098
My Mach3 software includes LazyTurn. Fed a properly formatted CAD file (.dxf or any of a dozen other types), LazyTurn adds your feed/cut/tool info and generates the proper G-code. The only openSCAD I've been able to get to work so far is a 2D shape laid out so the bottom edge is the X-axis and the 1/2 profile left is above it. (My terminology probably isn't correct. Picture a chess piece. Turn it sideways like it's mounted in a lathe. Now cut off the bottom half along the line going from the center of the spindle to the tailstock). I haven't tried any minkowski stuff yet, I'm still trying to get the whole hull thing to work like the tutorials I've found on the web. If I can learn to flatten a 3D into 2D, rotate it 90 degrees to the right, and slice it in half, then I might be able to get more to work. I spent a few hours trying today but didn't get very far so I went out and toyed with mounting the electronics instead.

Joe.



From: Alex Gibson <[hidden email]>

"I am interested in driving a lathe with profiles from openscad - I thought of doing a minkowski sum of my 2d profile shape and a series of  increasingly large circles...Does this sound useful as a plan?"



_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

Drew Rogge
In reply to this post by nophead
That's true but your takling about a pretty expensive CAM program if it can calculate roughing passes, etc. I kind of equate those to very fancy versions of mill CAM programs that can do pocketing, etc. Depending on the geometry you can get multiple passes by playing with cutter compensation, starting with a tool rad that larger than that of the actual tool and decreasing it for each pass.

On 10/31/14, 4:36 AM, nop head wrote:

> I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.
>
> On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.
>
>     Drew
>
>     On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
>     > Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
>     > I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>     >
>     > So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>     >
>     > thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>     >
>     > Joe Meyer
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > _______________________________________________
>     > OpenSCAD mailing list
>     > [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>     > http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>     > http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>
>     _______________________________________________
>     OpenSCAD mailing list
>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>     http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>     http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

Drew Rogge
In reply to this post by alexgibson
The problems with this and the cutter comp method I suggested is that 1) some detail like concave curves don't play well with large offsets and 2) these will give you equal depth of cut along both the X and Z axis. Lathes typically don't like taking large depths of cut in Z.

If you wanted to try generating multiple passes I would do something like starting with your 2D profile translated by +X and +Z to increase the resulting dia. of the part. I wouldn't translate Z much due to the depth of cut issue mentioned above. For each successive pass the offsets would be decreased by the depth of cut you desire in each axis. The decrease in Z would probably want to be much smaller that than that of X. With method you'd end up cutting a lot of air on the diameter in the initial cuts. Maybe removing the parts of your profile the extend outside of the rough stock would help speed things up.


On 10/31/14, 4:14 PM, Alex Gibson wrote:

> Dropping into this...
>
> I am interested in driving a lathe with profiles from openscad - I thought of doing a minkowski sum of my 2d profile shape and a series of  increasingly large circles...
>
> Does this sound useful as a plan?
>
> Cheers
> Alex Gibson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 31 Oct 2014, at 11:36, nop head <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>> I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.
>>
>> On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>     Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.
>>
>>     Drew
>>
>>     On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
>>     > Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
>>     > I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>>     >
>>     > So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>>     >
>>     > thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>>     >
>>     > Joe Meyer
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     > [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     > http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     > http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

jem1098
In reply to this post by Drew Rogge
LazyTurn does roughing/finishing. You feed it a properly formatted CAD generated file, tell it what tools you're using, speeds and feeds, and watch it go. It generates the codes while giving you a visual representation of the work being performed. If you tell it to do something with the wrong tool it will tell you that you are an idiot about to crash your lathe, and show you where that crash will occur. (I will probably end up using that feature quite a bit...) Mach3 is $175, the addons are another $50. I think that's cheap. In any case, it's not that part of the equation I'm having trouble with. I'm at the step before that. I am looking for a tutorial from someone who has used openSCAD to create profiles for turning on a lathe. I've already learned it can be done - I managed to make a simple profile that was basically nothing more than a large cylinder stepped down to a smaller cylinder, exported it, and transformed it to the proper g-code. Now I'd like to see how to do it properly so I can incorporate more than just square edges into my designs.

Joe
Drew Rogge wrote:
That's true but your takling about a pretty expensive CAM program if it can calculate roughing passes, etc. I kind of equate those to very fancy versions of mill CAM programs that can do pocketing, etc. Depending on the geometry you can get multiple passes by playing with cutter compensation, starting with a tool rad that larger than that of the actual tool and decreasing it for each pass.

On 10/31/14, 4:36 AM, nop head wrote:
> I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.



_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

nophead
In reply to this post by Drew Rogge
Here is a cheap lathe CAM program: http://www.cad2gcode.com/lathe/. I bought a copy but I haven't done much with it because my CNC lathe is permanently set up to churn out hobbed bolts at the moment.

On 1 November 2014 00:45, Drew Rogge <[hidden email]> wrote:
The problems with this and the cutter comp method I suggested is that 1) some detail like concave curves don't play well with large offsets and 2) these will give you equal depth of cut along both the X and Z axis. Lathes typically don't like taking large depths of cut in Z.

If you wanted to try generating multiple passes I would do something like starting with your 2D profile translated by +X and +Z to increase the resulting dia. of the part. I wouldn't translate Z much due to the depth of cut issue mentioned above. For each successive pass the offsets would be decreased by the depth of cut you desire in each axis. The decrease in Z would probably want to be much smaller that than that of X. With method you'd end up cutting a lot of air on the diameter in the initial cuts. Maybe removing the parts of your profile the extend outside of the rough stock would help speed things up.


On 10/31/14, 4:14 PM, Alex Gibson wrote:
> Dropping into this...
>
> I am interested in driving a lathe with profiles from openscad - I thought of doing a minkowski sum of my 2d profile shape and a series of  increasingly large circles...
>
> Does this sound useful as a plan?
>
> Cheers
> Alex Gibson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 31 Oct 2014, at 11:36, nop head <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>> I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.
>>
>> On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>     Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.
>>
>>     Drew
>>
>>     On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
>>     > Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
>>     > I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>>     >
>>     > So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>>     >
>>     > thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>>     >
>>     > Joe Meyer
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     > [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     > http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     > http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Lathe tutorial?

nophead
Sorry Joe, I didn't see your reply as Google put it in my spam filter.

On 1 November 2014 09:05, nop head <[hidden email]> wrote:
Here is a cheap lathe CAM program: http://www.cad2gcode.com/lathe/. I bought a copy but I haven't done much with it because my CNC lathe is permanently set up to churn out hobbed bolts at the moment.

On 1 November 2014 00:45, Drew Rogge <[hidden email]> wrote:
The problems with this and the cutter comp method I suggested is that 1) some detail like concave curves don't play well with large offsets and 2) these will give you equal depth of cut along both the X and Z axis. Lathes typically don't like taking large depths of cut in Z.

If you wanted to try generating multiple passes I would do something like starting with your 2D profile translated by +X and +Z to increase the resulting dia. of the part. I wouldn't translate Z much due to the depth of cut issue mentioned above. For each successive pass the offsets would be decreased by the depth of cut you desire in each axis. The decrease in Z would probably want to be much smaller that than that of X. With method you'd end up cutting a lot of air on the diameter in the initial cuts. Maybe removing the parts of your profile the extend outside of the rough stock would help speed things up.


On 10/31/14, 4:14 PM, Alex Gibson wrote:
> Dropping into this...
>
> I am interested in driving a lathe with profiles from openscad - I thought of doing a minkowski sum of my 2d profile shape and a series of  increasingly large circles...
>
> Does this sound useful as a plan?
>
> Cheers
> Alex Gibson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 31 Oct 2014, at 11:36, nop head <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>> I think you need a CAM program specific to lathes to go from DXF to G-code as it isn't simply a matter of traversing an outline. You have to take progressive cuts going in a bit further each time. Only the final cut is equal to the outline.
>>
>> On 31 October 2014 02:57, Drew Rogge <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>     Lathes are a bit different in that you only cut one side of the object. What I would do is to export a dxf file of a slice through the part lengthwise coincident with the center. Then feed the the dfx file into something like dxf2gcode to generate the gcode file. Even then dxf2gcode will try to traverse the entire outline of the part, not just one side. You might consider using a different CAD program like QCAD or FreeCAD. However even with those you'll have to use something like dxf2gcode.
>>
>>     Drew
>>
>>     On 10/30/14, 3:28 PM, Joe Meyer wrote:
>>     > Total newb here. I'm trying to use openSCAD to design things to turn on my lathe. I've quickly learned how to make simple 2D and 3D shapes, and have successfully exported them to the various types of available files (like .dxf or .stl) but I haven't been able to get anything to open in Mach3 or even LazyTurn. Every type of file I've made has had some fatal syntax error in it and looks nothing like G-code when I open it in Mach3.
>>     > I've gone through the wiki and printed out the cheat sheet.  I need to know if I start designing in 2D or 3D, convert one to the other somewhere in the middle, what type of file to export it to when I'm done, do I need to center everything along any particular axis when I'm designing, and probably a dozen other questions I haven't even thought of yet.
>>     >
>>     > So, does anyone know of a tutorial just for lathes, not mills? Maybe there is something that walks through the entire process of making some simple little candlestick or baseball bat and starts with "double-click the openSCAD icon" and ends with "open the .abc file in your CAM program."
>>     >
>>     > thanks in advance for any hints, websites, tutorials etc.
>>     >
>>     > Joe Meyer
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     >
>>     > _______________________________________________
>>     > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     > [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     > http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     > http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>     _______________________________________________
>>     OpenSCAD mailing list
>>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>     http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
>>     http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>



_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566