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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it true.  

E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component product,
not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical reaction once
the parts are mixed.  

When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:

E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that forms a
permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can be used
indoors or out. It is also paintable.


DanS wrote

> So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
> composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What is
> e6000 made of") you get this text:
>
> "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying, flexible
> *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl,
> leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
> bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson <

> dbg@

> > wrote:
>
>> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>>
>> --
>>   David Gustavson
>>  

> dbg@

>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>>
>> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high
>> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so it
>> has
>> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>>
>> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> health
>> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably be
>> less expensive.
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson <

> hugo@

> > wrote:
>>
>> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
>> 59ml
>> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend
>> PLA
>> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I
>> have
>> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24
>> hr. cure.
>>
>> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <

> alex@

> > wrote:
>> >
>> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>> >
>> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> 'Gorilla
>> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
>> joint.
>> >
>> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
>> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make
>> a
>> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> together
>> > at those points.
>> >
>> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
>> holes
>> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> through
>> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >
>> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> exactly
>> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >
>> > Cheers,
>> >
>> > Alex Gibson
>> >
>> >
>> > admg consulting
>> >
>> > edumaker limited
>> >
>> > . Project management
>> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> > . 3D Printing
>> >
>> > -----Original Message-----
>> > From: Discuss [mailto:

> discuss-bounces@.openscad

> ] On Behalf Of
>> Bryan
>> > Lee
>> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >
>> > I was just recommended this:
>> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >
>> >
>> > Thus

> arnholm@

>  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >>
>> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >>
>> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >

> Discuss@.openscad

>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >

> Discuss@.openscad

>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

Leea
In reply to this post by adrianv
He mentioned brands I never heard of.
I prefer this guys testing. He actually shows the test and numbers. And
I don't have to do my own data analysis.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4xX7VecgzA

Lee

On 7/19/2019 3:52 PM, adrianv wrote:

> Actually a thick or gel cyanoacrylate glue may be the best glue even for
> filling small gaps if you pick the right one.  Cheap superglues don't
> perform particularly well, but take a look at the test results below.  This
> glue test was done on wood, not PLA, but the CA glue 2P-10 was remarkably
> strong even in gap filling.  Much stronger than gorilla glue---in fact, it
> was the strongest glue tested in gaps, outperforming even epoxy.
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoaTZY5cSQE
> https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1GAZrhrtJPi8-iqPRVfqgOgf7RTg8Vqmen6OKJ4Ae6_I/edit#gid=321279609
>
> A problem with gorilla glue is that it expands into gaps by foaming, which
> makes it weak.
>
>
> alexgibson wrote
>> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>>
>> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> 'Gorilla
>> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
>> joint.
>>
>> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
>> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
>> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
>> at those points.
>>
>> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
>> holes
>> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
>> them while you do the other welds.
>>
>> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
>> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Alex Gibson
>>
>>
>> admg consulting
>>
>> edumaker limited
>>
>> . Project management
>> . Operations & Process improvement
>> . 3D Printing
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Discuss [mailto:
>> discuss-bounces@.openscad
>> ] On Behalf Of Bryan
>> Lee
>> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>>
>> I was just recommended this:
>> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>>
>>
>> Thus
>> arnholm@
>>   hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>>
>>> Carsten Arnholm
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> Discuss@.openscad
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> Discuss@.openscad
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>
> _______________________________________________
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> [hidden email]
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Re: Joining parts

RevarBat
In reply to this post by Steven Dick
A while back I designed a part for testing XY printer slop as well.


The value it finds is the extra spacing I had to give between mating faces to have a snug fit.  I double it for a sliding fit.

- Revar



On Jul 19, 2019, at 4:25 AM, Steven Dick <[hidden email]> wrote:

I actually designed a part to answer exactly this question.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3579313

If you print male and female parts that are exactly the same size,
they are unlikely to fit together.  If you taper one, you can press
them together up to a point at which they get stuck.  Where they get
stuck depends on the accuracy of your machine and to some extent the
type of plastic you are using.  How much they gets stuck depends on
the smoothness of the part and the slipperiness of the plastic.

The idea is that you print this part which has a taper, then you slide
the sides together, and measure where they get stuck and calculate a
tolerance from that.  In retrospect, this part only measures your XY
tolerance;  the Z tolerance will be different.  I suppose you could
try to rotate the part and print it, but if I had designed it for
that, I might not have made it so long and skinny.

Measuring the tolerance from this part only gives you a starting
point.  There are other factors that might change the tolerance over
the life of a printed part.  ABS stretches.  PLA stretches a bit less
but also rubs and changes shape.  Some of the size of the tolerance
comes from wobble in the printer, so if there are bumps in your PLA
part, some of those bumps are smoothed out a bit each time you slide
them together.   TPU does both but not permanently; I thought I could
get away with zero tolerance for TPU but found that isn't true, it
also needs some tolerance to make parts fit.

For sliding parts, my original Makerbot Cupcake with ABS needed
0.25mm.   My Ender 3 with PLA needs a bit more than 0.1mm.

For a friction fit, using the bumps in the Z axis isn't a bad idea,
assuming the part doesn't delaminate under pressure and fall apart
afterwards.
ABS friction fits nicely.  PLA seems to bind to itself less, so I'd
not try a XY friction fit there, as others have mentioned, I'd want to
make a peg that snaps in, although that works well in ABS too.

I'm not sure how legos do it; I would imagine they have an extremely
small dovetail taper or something.  Weather or not they use a taper,
they do use extremely tight tolerances.

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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
In reply to this post by Leea
I'm not quite sure what you mean.  The reference I posted the guy shows all
the numbers, and his testing was *much* better because he did multiple cases
for each test and computing statistics, and he uses a test setup that I
think is documented.  The final analysis is in the spreadsheet so I'm not
sure why you "have to do your own data analysis", but I think he also
describes performance in the video.  I also noticed that he's got another
hour long video with more info.

His approach to testing wood adhesion is laughably limited if you care about
that.  

Lastly, your reference doesn't test any cyanoacrylate glues, so it doesn't
give us any clue about their performance.  


Leea wrote

> He mentioned brands I never heard of.
> I prefer this guys testing. He actually shows the test and numbers. And
> I don't have to do my own data analysis.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4xX7VecgzA
>
> Lee
>
> On 7/19/2019 3:52 PM, adrianv wrote:
>> Actually a thick or gel cyanoacrylate glue may be the best glue even for
>> filling small gaps if you pick the right one.  Cheap superglues don't
>> perform particularly well, but take a look at the test results below.
>> This
>> glue test was done on wood, not PLA, but the CA glue 2P-10 was remarkably
>> strong even in gap filling.  Much stronger than gorilla glue---in fact,
>> it
>> was the strongest glue tested in gaps, outperforming even epoxy.
>>
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoaTZY5cSQE
>> https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1GAZrhrtJPi8-iqPRVfqgOgf7RTg8Vqmen6OKJ4Ae6_I/edit#gid=321279609
>>
>> A problem with gorilla glue is that it expands into gaps by foaming,
>> which
>> makes it weak.
>>
>>
>> alexgibson wrote
>>> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>>>
>>> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>>> 'Gorilla
>>> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
>>> joint.
>>>
>>> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
>>> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make
>>> a
>>> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>>> together
>>> at those points.
>>>
>>> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
>>> holes
>>> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>>> through
>>> them while you do the other welds.
>>>
>>> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>>> exactly
>>> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>>> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Alex Gibson
>>>
>>>
>>> admg consulting
>>>
>>> edumaker limited
>>>
>>> . Project management
>>> . Operations & Process improvement
>>> . 3D Printing
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Discuss [mailto:
>>> discuss-bounces@.openscad
>>> ] On Behalf Of Bryan
>>> Lee
>>> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>>> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>>> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>>>
>>> I was just recommended this:
>>> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>>>
>>>
>>> Thus
>>> arnholm@
>>>   hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>>> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>>>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>>>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>>>
>>>> Carsten Arnholm
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>> Discuss@.openscad
>>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>> Discuss@.openscad
>>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

DanS
In reply to this post by adrianv
Yes, just because it is on the internet doesn't mean it is true- but it is a LOT better than one random persons opinion.

Saying it is obviously not epoxy because it is one part composition doesn't prove anything.  Epoxy is typically two part but it doesn't have to be, there are plenty of commercial one part epoxy formulations.


On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:10 PM adrianv <[hidden email]> wrote:
Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it true. 

E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component product,
not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical reaction once
the parts are mixed. 

When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:

E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that forms a
permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can be used
indoors or out. It is also paintable.


DanS wrote
> So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
> composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What is
> e6000 made of") you get this text:
>
> "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying, flexible
> *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl,
> leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
> bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson &lt;

> dbg@

> &gt; wrote:
>
>> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>>
>> --
>>   David Gustavson
>>   

> dbg@

>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>>
>> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high
>> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so it
>> has
>> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>>
>> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> health
>> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably be
>> less expensive.
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson &lt;

> hugo@

> &gt; wrote:
>>
>> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
>> 59ml
>> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend
>> PLA
>> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I
>> have
>> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24
>> hr. cure.
>>
>> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson &lt;

> alex@

> &gt; wrote:
>> >
>> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>> >
>> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> 'Gorilla
>> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
>> joint.
>> >
>> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
>> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make
>> a
>> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> together
>> > at those points.
>> >
>> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
>> holes
>> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> through
>> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >
>> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> exactly
>> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >
>> > Cheers,
>> >
>> > Alex Gibson
>> >
>> >
>> > admg consulting
>> >
>> > edumaker limited
>> >
>> > . Project management
>> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> > . 3D Printing
>> >
>> > -----Original Message-----
>> > From: Discuss [mailto:

> discuss-bounces@.openscad

> ] On Behalf Of
>> Bryan
>> > Lee
>> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >
>> > I was just recommended this:
>> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >
>> >
>> > Thus

> arnholm@

>  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >>
>> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >>
>> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >

> Discuss@.openscad

>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >

> Discuss@.openscad

>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
Interesting.  You're right that there are one part epoxies.  I have never
seen that before.  It appears that they work by using temperature to induce
the reaction between the epoxy resin and hardener.  So 3M product 2214 cures
when you apply 248 degrees F.   I haven't yet found a one-part epoxy that
cures at room temperature though.  How would you delay the chemical reaction
until the desired moment?  

The manufacturer of E6000 (Eclectic Products) does not describe it as
"epoxy", just as "adhesive" and the formulation is secret, so it's not clear
how a craft supply company you cite reached the conclusion that the product
is an epoxy.  


DanS wrote

> Yes, just because it is on the internet doesn't mean it is true- but it is
> a LOT better than one random persons opinion.
>
> Saying it is obviously not epoxy because it is one part composition
> doesn't
> prove anything.  Epoxy is typically two part but it doesn't have to be,
> there are plenty of commercial one part epoxy formulations.
>
> https://easycrafts.fandom.com/wiki/E6000
>
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:10 PM adrianv &lt;

> avm4@

> &gt; wrote:
>
>> Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it true.
>>
>> E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component product,
>> not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical reaction
>> once
>> the parts are mixed.
>>
>> When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:
>>
>> E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
>> requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that forms a
>> permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can be
>> used
>> indoors or out. It is also paintable.
>>
>>
>> DanS wrote
>> > So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
>> > composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What
>> is
>> > e6000 made of") you get this text:
>> >
>> > "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying,
>> flexible
>> > *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl,
>> > leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
>> > bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>> >
>> > On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson &lt;
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >
>> >> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>   David Gustavson
>> >>
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high
>> >> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so
>> it
>> >> has
>> >> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>> >>
>> >> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> >> health
>> >> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably
>> be
>> >> less expensive.
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson &lt;
>>
>> > hugo@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> >> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
>> >> 59ml
>> >> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend
>> >> PLA
>> >> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I
>> >> have
>> >> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a
>> 24
>> >> hr. cure.
>> >>
>> >> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson &lt;
>>
>> > alex@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good
>> contact.
>> >> >
>> >> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> >> 'Gorilla
>> >> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less
>> brittle
>> >> joint.
>> >> >
>> >> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.
>> For
>> a
>> >> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part,
>> make
>> >> a
>> >> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> >> together
>> >> > at those points.
>> >> >
>> >> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with
>> the
>> >> holes
>> >> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> >> through
>> >> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >> >
>> >> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> >> exactly
>> >> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> >> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >> >
>> >> > Cheers,
>> >> >
>> >> > Alex Gibson
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > admg consulting
>> >> >
>> >> > edumaker limited
>> >> >
>> >> > . Project management
>> >> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> >> > . 3D Printing
>> >> >
>> >> > -----Original Message-----
>> >> > From: Discuss [mailto:
>>
>> > discuss-bounces@.openscad
>>
>> > ] On Behalf Of
>> >> Bryan
>> >> > Lee
>> >> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> >> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> >> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >> >
>> >> > I was just recommended this:
>> >> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Thus
>>
>> > arnholm@
>>
>> >  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> >> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> >> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> >
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> >
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

DanS
Determining what E6000 really is would require spectroscopy.

The maker will certainly not want to disclose the composition (whatever it is) since they are trying to keep it a trade secret.

If it does have epoxy in it it is not a typical epoxy formulation (probably has copolymers and/or something to inhibit or reduce crosslinking- because most standard epoxy formulations get highly crosslinked and thus are hard and not flexible).  That being said there already are flexible epoxy formulations like masterbond "ep51fl-1"

There are one part epoxy formulations that cure at room temperature using UV light.  There may be other cure mechanisms for one part epoxies.

So in the absence of spectroscopic data I'm just using a random website to suggest what it is.

The known thing is that they use a chlorinated solvent, which is bad news healthwise.

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 8:45 PM adrianv <[hidden email]> wrote:
Interesting.  You're right that there are one part epoxies.  I have never
seen that before.  It appears that they work by using temperature to induce
the reaction between the epoxy resin and hardener.  So 3M product 2214 cures
when you apply 248 degrees F.   I haven't yet found a one-part epoxy that
cures at room temperature though.  How would you delay the chemical reaction
until the desired moment? 

The manufacturer of E6000 (Eclectic Products) does not describe it as
"epoxy", just as "adhesive" and the formulation is secret, so it's not clear
how a craft supply company you cite reached the conclusion that the product
is an epoxy. 


DanS wrote
> Yes, just because it is on the internet doesn't mean it is true- but it is
> a LOT better than one random persons opinion.
>
> Saying it is obviously not epoxy because it is one part composition
> doesn't
> prove anything.  Epoxy is typically two part but it doesn't have to be,
> there are plenty of commercial one part epoxy formulations.
>
> https://easycrafts.fandom.com/wiki/E6000
>
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:10 PM adrianv &lt;

> avm4@

> &gt; wrote:
>
>> Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it true.
>>
>> E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component product,
>> not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical reaction
>> once
>> the parts are mixed.
>>
>> When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:
>>
>> E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
>> requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that forms a
>> permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can be
>> used
>> indoors or out. It is also paintable.
>>
>>
>> DanS wrote
>> > So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
>> > composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What
>> is
>> > e6000 made of") you get this text:
>> >
>> > "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying,
>> flexible
>> > *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl,
>> > leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
>> > bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>> >
>> > On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson &lt;
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >
>> >> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>   David Gustavson
>> >>
>>
>> > dbg@
>>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high
>> >> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so
>> it
>> >> has
>> >> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>> >>
>> >> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> >> health
>> >> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably
>> be
>> >> less expensive.
>> >>
>> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson &lt;
>>
>> > hugo@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> >> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
>> >> 59ml
>> >> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend
>> >> PLA
>> >> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I
>> >> have
>> >> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a
>> 24
>> >> hr. cure.
>> >>
>> >> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson &lt;
>>
>> > alex@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good
>> contact.
>> >> >
>> >> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> >> 'Gorilla
>> >> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less
>> brittle
>> >> joint.
>> >> >
>> >> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.
>> For
>> a
>> >> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part,
>> make
>> >> a
>> >> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> >> together
>> >> > at those points.
>> >> >
>> >> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with
>> the
>> >> holes
>> >> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> >> through
>> >> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >> >
>> >> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> >> exactly
>> >> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> >> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >> >
>> >> > Cheers,
>> >> >
>> >> > Alex Gibson
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > admg consulting
>> >> >
>> >> > edumaker limited
>> >> >
>> >> > . Project management
>> >> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> >> > . 3D Printing
>> >> >
>> >> > -----Original Message-----
>> >> > From: Discuss [mailto:
>>
>> > discuss-bounces@.openscad
>>
>> > ] On Behalf Of
>> >> Bryan
>> >> > Lee
>> >> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> >> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> >> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >> >
>> >> > I was just recommended this:
>> >> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Thus
>>
>> > arnholm@
>>
>> >  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> >> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> >> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> >
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> >
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
3M has a DP105 epoxy  (a two part formulation) which they describe as very
flexible, though I don't know that it's as flexible as E6000.  I don't think
of flexibility as a non-epoxy characteristic.  The E6000 cures at room
temperature from exposure to air.   It does not require energy input via
heat or UV light.  

I can also say that the fumes from E6000 are much nastier than the fumes
from any epoxy I've ever used---I'd definitely use epoxy first given a
choice.  

I did a search for "E6000 epoxy" and the results are all things like "is
E6000 better than epoxy" or "E6000 vs epoxy".  The easycrafts wiki that you
found was the only claim I encountered that E6000 is an epoxy.  I'm
skeptical that whoever wrote that did their own chemical analysis.  It's
also not clear that this is "better than one random person's opinion".  It
may in fact *be* one random person's post, perhaps a careless post from
someone who thinks all clear adhesives are epoxy.  The manufacturer does not
claim it's an epoxy.  And neither does anybody else.  It also doesn't behave
like any epoxy I've encountered.  So in the absence of chemical analysis, it
seems to me that the best guess is that the product is *not* an epoxy.  

As a brief on-topic remark, I'll note also that I made a two-piece part that
snapped together with just a friction fit using a cylinder into a hole.  It
was pretty hard to get apart after putting it together, but I still used
glue (CA) to ensure a permanent joint.  


DanS wrote

> Determining what E6000 really is would require spectroscopy.
>
> The maker will certainly not want to disclose the composition (whatever it
> is) since they are trying to keep it a trade secret.
>
> If it does have epoxy in it it is not a typical epoxy formulation
> (probably
> has copolymers and/or something to inhibit or reduce crosslinking- because
> most standard epoxy formulations get highly crosslinked and thus are hard
> and not flexible).  That being said there already are flexible epoxy
> formulations like masterbond "ep51fl-1"
>
> There are one part epoxy formulations that cure at room temperature using
> UV light.  There may be other cure mechanisms for one part epoxies.
>
> So in the absence of spectroscopic data I'm just using a random website to
> suggest what it is.
>
> The known thing is that they use a chlorinated solvent, which is bad news
> healthwise.
>
> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 8:45 PM adrianv &lt;

> avm4@

> &gt; wrote:
>
>> Interesting.  You're right that there are one part epoxies.  I have never
>> seen that before.  It appears that they work by using temperature to
>> induce
>> the reaction between the epoxy resin and hardener.  So 3M product 2214
>> cures
>> when you apply 248 degrees F.   I haven't yet found a one-part epoxy that
>> cures at room temperature though.  How would you delay the chemical
>> reaction
>> until the desired moment?
>>
>> The manufacturer of E6000 (Eclectic Products) does not describe it as
>> "epoxy", just as "adhesive" and the formulation is secret, so it's not
>> clear
>> how a craft supply company you cite reached the conclusion that the
>> product
>> is an epoxy.
>>
>>
>> DanS wrote
>> > Yes, just because it is on the internet doesn't mean it is true- but it
>> is
>> > a LOT better than one random persons opinion.
>> >
>> > Saying it is obviously not epoxy because it is one part composition
>> > doesn't
>> > prove anything.  Epoxy is typically two part but it doesn't have to be,
>> > there are plenty of commercial one part epoxy formulations.
>> >
>> > https://easycrafts.fandom.com/wiki/E6000
>> >
>> > On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 5:10 PM adrianv &lt;
>>
>> > avm4@
>>
>> > &gt; wrote:
>> >
>> >> Just because you found it somewhere on the internet doesn't make it
>> true.
>> >>
>> >> E6000 is obviously not an epoxy because it is a single component
>> product,
>> >> not a 2 part product like an epoxy that cures through chemical
>> reaction
>> >> once
>> >> the parts are mixed.
>> >>
>> >> When I googled "What is E6000" I got this:
>> >>
>> >> E6000 is an adhesive formulated to meet high performance industrial
>> >> requirements. It is a non-flammable, vibration proof product that
>> forms
>> a
>> >> permanent, waterproof bond. E6000 offers extreme flexibility and can
>> be
>> >> used
>> >> indoors or out. It is also paintable.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> DanS wrote
>> >> > So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the
>> >> > composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google
>> ("What
>> >> is
>> >> > e6000 made of") you get this text:
>> >> >
>> >> > "E6000 is an industrial-strength *glue* made from a clear drying,
>> >> flexible
>> >> > *epoxy* that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber,
>> vinyl,
>> >> > leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air
>> >> > bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."
>> >> >
>> >> > On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson &lt;
>> >>
>> >> > dbg@
>> >>
>> >> > &gt; wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >> E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> --
>> >> >>   David Gustavson
>> >> >>
>> >>
>> >> > dbg@
>> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
>> >> >>
>> >> >> E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for
>> high
>> >> >> strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent
>> so
>> >> it
>> >> >> has
>> >> >> the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low
>> >> >> health
>> >> >> risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would
>> probably
>> >> be
>> >> >> less expensive.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson &lt;
>> >>
>> >> > hugo@
>> >>
>> >> > &gt; wrote:
>> >> >>
>> >> >> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
>> >> >> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes
>> in
>> a
>> >> >> 59ml
>> >> >> grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my
>> friend
>> >> >> PLA
>> >> >> parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing
>> but
>> I
>> >> >> have
>> >> >> used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires
>> a
>> >> 24
>> >> >> hr. cure.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> > On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson &lt;
>> >>
>> >> > alex@
>> >>
>> >> > &gt; wrote:
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good
>> >> contact.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the
>> original
>> >> >> 'Gorilla
>> >> >> > glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less
>> >> brittle
>> >> >> joint.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.
>> >> For
>> >> a
>> >> >> > really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the
>> part,
>> >> make
>> >> >> a
>> >> >> > grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> >> >> together
>> >> >> > at those points.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up
>> with
>> >> the
>> >> >> holes
>> >> >> > for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a
>> bolt
>> >> >> through
>> >> >> > them while you do the other welds.
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are
>> >> >> exactly
>> >> >> > the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> >> >> > https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > Cheers,
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > Alex Gibson
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > admg consulting
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > edumaker limited
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > . Project management
>> >> >> > . Operations & Process improvement
>> >> >> > . 3D Printing
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > -----Original Message-----
>> >> >> > From: Discuss [mailto:
>> >>
>> >> > discuss-bounces@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> > ] On Behalf Of
>> >> >> Bryan
>> >> >> > Lee
>> >> >> > Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> >> >> > To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> >> >> > Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > I was just recommended this:
>> >> >> >       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > Thus
>> >>
>> >> > arnholm@
>> >>
>> >> >  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> >> >> > +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> >> >> >> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> >> >> >>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something
>> easily
>> >> >> >> available and superglue fits the bill.
>> >> >> >>
>> >> >> >> Carsten Arnholm
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >> >
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >> >
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >> >
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >> >
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >>
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >>
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >>
>> >> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >>
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >>
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >> >>
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >>
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >> >>
>> >> >
>> >> > _______________________________________________
>> >> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>> >> > Discuss@.openscad
>> >>
>> >> >
>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>> >>
>> >> _______________________________________________
>> >> OpenSCAD mailing list
>> >>
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> >> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>> >>
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > OpenSCAD mailing list
>>
>> > Discuss@.openscad
>>
>> > http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

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>>
>
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Re: Joining parts

gewoods3
In reply to this post by DanS
I have not read this entire  thread, so I hope this is not duplicate
information. The active ingredient for bonding PLA parts is dichloromethane
or methylene chloride, same thing. Search "PLA dichloromethane". 3D Gloop
PLA (https://www.3dgloop.com/shop/pla-gloop) and SCIGRIP 16 (Amazon) have
dichloromethane. I prefer SCIGRIP 16. Either of these products don''t just
glue PLA, they bond PLA as one part. 3D Gloop might send you a sample if you
ask nicely.



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Re: Joining parts

DanS
gewoods3 that works, and was stated before.  nop_head was also reporting ethyl acetate works; ethyl acetate has a MUCH lower to toxicity, and is easier on the environment.  You could probably substitute many other ester solvents (though ethyl acetate is probably the least expensive).  Solvent welds will have a lower strength than a continuously cast part, but considering PLA is not exactly known for durability probably a good option.

On Sat, Jul 20, 2019 at 11:04 AM gewoods3 <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have not read this entire  thread, so I hope this is not duplicate
information. The active ingredient for bonding PLA parts is dichloromethane
or methylene chloride, same thing. Search "PLA dichloromethane". 3D Gloop
PLA (https://www.3dgloop.com/shop/pla-gloop) and SCIGRIP 16 (Amazon) have
dichloromethane. I prefer SCIGRIP 16. Either of these products don''t just
glue PLA, they bond PLA as one part. 3D Gloop might send you a sample if you
ask nicely.



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Re: Joining parts

nophead
Note I haven't tried solvent welding with it yet but I have dissolved PLA with it and I use to clean my glass bed when printing PLA.

On Sat, 20 Jul 2019 at 16:23, Dan Shriver <[hidden email]> wrote:
gewoods3 that works, and was stated before.  nop_head was also reporting ethyl acetate works; ethyl acetate has a MUCH lower to toxicity, and is easier on the environment.  You could probably substitute many other ester solvents (though ethyl acetate is probably the least expensive).  Solvent welds will have a lower strength than a continuously cast part, but considering PLA is not exactly known for durability probably a good option.

On Sat, Jul 20, 2019 at 11:04 AM gewoods3 <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have not read this entire  thread, so I hope this is not duplicate
information. The active ingredient for bonding PLA parts is dichloromethane
or methylene chloride, same thing. Search "PLA dichloromethane". 3D Gloop
PLA (https://www.3dgloop.com/shop/pla-gloop) and SCIGRIP 16 (Amazon) have
dichloromethane. I prefer SCIGRIP 16. Either of these products don''t just
glue PLA, they bond PLA as one part. 3D Gloop might send you a sample if you
ask nicely.



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