Joining parts

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Re: Joining parts

cacb
On 2019-07-19 09:01, Frank van der Hulst wrote:
> I know you're looking for purely 3d printed solutions, but sometimes
> it's just easier to glue things together.  In those circumstances I
> design matching 2mm holes into the parts. Then glue short pieces of
> 1.75mm filament into one set of holes to function as alignment pins
> for assembling the parts.

I think that is a very practical and sensible approach, nice idea. What
kind of glue do you use for PLA joined this way?

Carsten Arnholm

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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Juan C.Cilleruelo
In reply to this post by nophead

Yes, of course. I'm developing software for Furniture Manufacturing. His base is a powerful smart product configurator based on "Mass Customization" principles.

But our brain needs images to see the power of this tool. My program generates the images as OpenSCAD scripts and launches it to show the currently product configuration.

You can draw many types of parts. The more complex are in .scad files or in STL files, to make it as many standard as possible.

At this moment I'm drawing profiles, maybe wood profiles or aluminium profiles. If I use an OpenSCAD script, with only 2D instructions, it works well of course. But after I need to extrude a plain image and I want to do it based on an STL file, to maintain the unity of the software.

Next is the code used to generate the aluminium profile I've used as example:

module InternalCross(){
   translate([0, 0, 0]){
      rotate(-45)
      translate([-0.75, 1, 0])
      square([1.5, 26]);
   }

   translate([20, 0, 0]){
      rotate(45)
      translate([-0.75, 1, 0])
      square([1.5, 26]);
   }
}

module Corner(){
$fn = 100;
   offset(.5) offset(-.5) square([1.5, 7  ]);
   offset(.5) offset(-.5) square([7  , 1.5]);
}

module CornerSquare(){
$fn = 100;
   offset(.5) offset(-.5) square([4.5, 4.5]);
   offset(.5) offset(-.5) square([4.5, 4.5]);
}

module CentralSquare(){
    square(7.52);  
}

module CentralRound(){
    circle(d=4.2, $fn=100);
}

module nutProfile20x20(){
    difference(){
        union(){
            InternalCross();
            Corner();
            translate([20,  0, 0]) rotate( 90) Corner();
            translate([20, 20, 0]) rotate(180) Corner();
            translate([ 0, 20, 0]) rotate(270) Corner();

            CornerSquare();
            translate([20-4.5,      0, 0]) CornerSquare();
            translate([20-4.5, 20-4.5, 0]) CornerSquare();
            translate([     0, 20-4.5, 0]) CornerSquare();

            translate([6.25, 6.25, 0]) CentralSquare();
       }
       translate([10, 10, 0]) CentralRound();
    }
}

module BasicProfile20Female(Length){
   union(){
        difference(){
            linear_extrude(Length)
           nutProfile20x20();
        }
    }
}

linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
    nutProfile20x20();
}


(I can't send you the images of the result, because I've tried it but the forum has currently a problem with inserted images into the messages.)

Use this code to after render it to generate the STL file. And after, use the code of the previous message to extrude it.

Really works, with the projection() instruction.

Thanks again!


On 19/07/2019 09:47, nop head wrote:
Glad to help! 

I can see why you needed it now. Where did you get the profile STL from?

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:43, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }

On 19/07/2019 09:11, nop head wrote:
All those statements are true. To export and import 2D shapes you need to use a 2D format like DXF or SVG.

You can convert a 3D shape to 2D with projection(), so if you have a flat object in an STL file you can make it 2D and then linear_extrude it.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:04, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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Re: Joining parts

frankv
In reply to this post by cacb
Depends on the strength needed... hot glue where strength isn't needed, otherwise epoxy. If your parts mate perfectly, then cyanoacrylate would be good. 

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019, 19:52 , <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2019-07-19 09:01, Frank van der Hulst wrote:
> I know you're looking for purely 3d printed solutions, but sometimes
> it's just easier to glue things together.  In those circumstances I
> design matching 2mm holes into the parts. Then glue short pieces of
> 1.75mm filament into one set of holes to function as alignment pins
> for assembling the parts.

I think that is a very practical and sensible approach, nice idea. What
kind of glue do you use for PLA joined this way?

Carsten Arnholm

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Re: Joining parts

Steven Dick
In reply to this post by JordanBrown
I actually designed a part to answer exactly this question.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3579313

If you print male and female parts that are exactly the same size,
they are unlikely to fit together.  If you taper one, you can press
them together up to a point at which they get stuck.  Where they get
stuck depends on the accuracy of your machine and to some extent the
type of plastic you are using.  How much they gets stuck depends on
the smoothness of the part and the slipperiness of the plastic.

The idea is that you print this part which has a taper, then you slide
the sides together, and measure where they get stuck and calculate a
tolerance from that.  In retrospect, this part only measures your XY
tolerance;  the Z tolerance will be different.  I suppose you could
try to rotate the part and print it, but if I had designed it for
that, I might not have made it so long and skinny.

Measuring the tolerance from this part only gives you a starting
point.  There are other factors that might change the tolerance over
the life of a printed part.  ABS stretches.  PLA stretches a bit less
but also rubs and changes shape.  Some of the size of the tolerance
comes from wobble in the printer, so if there are bumps in your PLA
part, some of those bumps are smoothed out a bit each time you slide
them together.   TPU does both but not permanently; I thought I could
get away with zero tolerance for TPU but found that isn't true, it
also needs some tolerance to make parts fit.

For sliding parts, my original Makerbot Cupcake with ABS needed
0.25mm.   My Ender 3 with PLA needs a bit more than 0.1mm.

For a friction fit, using the bumps in the Z axis isn't a bad idea,
assuming the part doesn't delaminate under pressure and fall apart
afterwards.
ABS friction fits nicely.  PLA seems to bind to itself less, so I'd
not try a XY friction fit there, as others have mentioned, I'd want to
make a peg that snaps in, although that works well in ABS too.

I'm not sure how legos do it; I would imagine they have an extremely
small dovetail taper or something.  Weather or not they use a taper,
they do use extremely tight tolerances.

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Re: Joining parts

acwest
The best way to find out how the snap pins work is to print Emmet's gear cube https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:213946
There are two versions of the hole inset, one which allows rotation and one which is fixed. They hold very solidly, but can be pulled apart with enough effort. The smallest I have been able to make useful pins is 4mm long with a 2.5mm diameter, anything smaller than that is too fragile to use.
The fully customisable pins are at https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3218332, and the output options include a test socket you can print to try it... The code generates an STL for the pin, which is printed flat, and an STL for the socket, which is difference'd from the surface you want to embed the pin in.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019, 07:26 Steven Dick, <[hidden email]> wrote:
I actually designed a part to answer exactly this question.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3579313

If you print male and female parts that are exactly the same size,
they are unlikely to fit together.  If you taper one, you can press
them together up to a point at which they get stuck.  Where they get
stuck depends on the accuracy of your machine and to some extent the
type of plastic you are using.  How much they gets stuck depends on
the smoothness of the part and the slipperiness of the plastic.

The idea is that you print this part which has a taper, then you slide
the sides together, and measure where they get stuck and calculate a
tolerance from that.  In retrospect, this part only measures your XY
tolerance;  the Z tolerance will be different.  I suppose you could
try to rotate the part and print it, but if I had designed it for
that, I might not have made it so long and skinny.

Measuring the tolerance from this part only gives you a starting
point.  There are other factors that might change the tolerance over
the life of a printed part.  ABS stretches.  PLA stretches a bit less
but also rubs and changes shape.  Some of the size of the tolerance
comes from wobble in the printer, so if there are bumps in your PLA
part, some of those bumps are smoothed out a bit each time you slide
them together.   TPU does both but not permanently; I thought I could
get away with zero tolerance for TPU but found that isn't true, it
also needs some tolerance to make parts fit.

For sliding parts, my original Makerbot Cupcake with ABS needed
0.25mm.   My Ender 3 with PLA needs a bit more than 0.1mm.

For a friction fit, using the bumps in the Z axis isn't a bad idea,
assuming the part doesn't delaminate under pressure and fall apart
afterwards.
ABS friction fits nicely.  PLA seems to bind to itself less, so I'd
not try a XY friction fit there, as others have mentioned, I'd want to
make a peg that snaps in, although that works well in ABS too.

I'm not sure how legos do it; I would imagine they have an extremely
small dovetail taper or something.  Weather or not they use a taper,
they do use extremely tight tolerances.

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Re: Joining parts

leebc
In reply to this post by cacb
Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 09:51:43AM +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:

> I think that is a very practical and sensible approach, nice idea. What kind
> of glue do you use for PLA joined this way?

I was just reading last night that:
        "PLA is soluble in solvents, hot benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and dioxane."
and "PLLA can be solvent welded using dichloromethane."
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polylactic_acid#Materials_properties ]

Read the Material Safety Data Sheets on those first, as they may be
carcinogenic and pose other hazards.

Dichloromethane "is also used extensively by model building hobbyists for
joining plastic components together. It is commonly referred to as
"Di-clo." "  So it's use for gluing plastic seems fairly common.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichloromethane ]

Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.

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Re: Joining parts

nophead
PLA is also soluble in ethyl acetate, which is a lot safer. 

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019, 15:40 Bryan Lee, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 09:51:43AM +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:

> I think that is a very practical and sensible approach, nice idea. What kind
> of glue do you use for PLA joined this way?

I was just reading last night that:
        "PLA is soluble in solvents, hot benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and dioxane."
and     "PLLA can be solvent welded using dichloromethane."
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polylactic_acid#Materials_properties ]

Read the Material Safety Data Sheets on those first, as they may be
carcinogenic and pose other hazards.

Dichloromethane "is also used extensively by model building hobbyists for
joining plastic components together. It is commonly referred to as
"Di-clo." "  So it's use for gluing plastic seems fairly common.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichloromethane ]

Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.

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Re: Joining parts

DanS
In reply to this post by leebc
Dichloromethane definitely is carcinogenic.  If you want to make a permanent join on PLA (which I don't hence I was asking for friction fit snaps) I'd recommend (aside from adhesives) maybe trying to heat or ultrasonic weld it.

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 10:40 AM Bryan Lee <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 09:51:43AM +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:

> I think that is a very practical and sensible approach, nice idea. What kind
> of glue do you use for PLA joined this way?

I was just reading last night that:
        "PLA is soluble in solvents, hot benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and dioxane."
and     "PLLA can be solvent welded using dichloromethane."
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polylactic_acid#Materials_properties ]

Read the Material Safety Data Sheets on those first, as they may be
carcinogenic and pose other hazards.

Dichloromethane "is also used extensively by model building hobbyists for
joining plastic components together. It is commonly referred to as
"Di-clo." "  So it's use for gluing plastic seems fairly common.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichloromethane ]

Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.

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Re: Joining parts

cacb
In reply to this post by leebc
On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.

Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
available and superglue fits the bill.

Carsten Arnholm

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Re: Joining parts

leebc
I was just recommended this:
        https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX


Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
> > Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>
> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
> available and superglue fits the bill.
>
> Carsten Arnholm

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Re: Joining parts

alexgibson
I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.

For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original 'Gorilla
glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle joint.

Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
at those points.

You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the holes
for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
them while you do the other welds.

This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm

Cheers,

Alex Gibson


admg consulting

edumaker limited

. Project management
. Operations & Process improvement
. 3D Printing

-----Original Message-----
From: Discuss [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Bryan
Lee
Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
To: OpenSCAD general discussion
Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts

I was just recommended this:
        https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX


Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
+0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
> > Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>
> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
> available and superglue fits the bill.
>
> Carsten Arnholm

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Re: Joining parts

boxcarmib
E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a 59ml grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend PLA parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I have used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24 hr. cure.

> On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>
> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original 'Gorilla
> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle joint.
>
> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
> at those points.
>
> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the holes
> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
> them while you do the other welds.
>
> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alex Gibson
>
>
> admg consulting
>
> edumaker limited
>
> . Project management
> . Operations & Process improvement
> . 3D Printing
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Discuss [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Bryan
> Lee
> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>
> I was just recommended this:
> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>
>
> Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>
>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>
>> Carsten Arnholm
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org


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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Ronaldo
In reply to this post by Juan C.Cilleruelo
To linear_extrude the projection of a linear_extruded shape in a STL file seems to be a nonsense. You just need to resize its import:

resize([20,20,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");

Alternatively, you can generate the profile STL with a unitary height and scale its import:

scale([1,1,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");


Em sex, 19 de jul de 2019 às 08:19, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> escreveu:

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }




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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

nophead
Yes that is a better way to do it if you know the height of the STL. Projection is very slow.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 17:40, Ronaldo Persiano <[hidden email]> wrote:
To linear_extrude the projection of a linear_extruded shape in a STL file seems to be a nonsense. You just need to resize its import:

resize([20,20,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");

Alternatively, you can generate the profile STL with a unitary height and scale its import:

scale([1,1,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");


Em sex, 19 de jul de 2019 às 08:19, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> escreveu:

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }



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Re: Joining parts

DanS
In reply to this post by boxcarmib
E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so it has the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.

nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low health risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably be less expensive.

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a 59ml grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend PLA parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I have used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24 hr. cure.

> On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>
> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original 'Gorilla
> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle joint.
>
> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
> at those points.
>
> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the holes
> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
> them while you do the other welds.
>
> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alex Gibson
>
>
> admg consulting
>
> edumaker limited
>
> . Project management
> . Operations & Process improvement
> . 3D Printing
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Discuss [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Bryan
> Lee
> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>
> I was just recommended this:
>       https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>
>
> Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>
>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>
>> Carsten Arnholm
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> [hidden email]
> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org


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Re: Joining parts

David B. Gustavson
E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.

-- 
  David Gustavson



On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so it has the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.

nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low health risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably be less expensive.

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a 59ml grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend PLA parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I have used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24 hr. cure.

> On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>
> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original 'Gorilla
> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle joint.
>
> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
> at those points.
>
> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the holes
> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
> them while you do the other welds.
>
> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alex Gibson
>
>
> admg consulting
>
> edumaker limited
>
> . Project management
> . Operations & Process improvement
> . 3D Printing
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Discuss [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Bryan
> Lee
> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>
> I was just recommended this:
>
>
> Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>
>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>
>> Carsten Arnholm
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list


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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Juan C.Cilleruelo
In reply to this post by Ronaldo

This response seems to be, actually, a nonsense.

If I am the creator of the STL and I positioned it, as you can see, exactly in X = 0, Y = 0 and Z = 0 and plain to Z, I'm almost sure I don't need to resize it!

scale() and resize() deforms the original figure. linear_extrude only "EXTRUDE" it.  This is what I want. An extrusion.

Thanks for your response, but it's not an appropriate solution for my problem.



On 19/07/2019 18:40, Ronaldo Persiano wrote:
To linear_extrude the projection of a linear_extruded shape in a STL file seems to be a nonsense. You just need to resize its import:

resize([20,20,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");

Alternatively, you can generate the profile STL with a unitary height and scale its import:

scale([1,1,40])
  import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");


Em sex, 19 de jul de 2019 às 08:19, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> escreveu:

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }




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Re: Joining parts

DanS
In reply to this post by David B. Gustavson
So it is kind of hard to be definitive since they want to keep the composition a trade secret - that being said if you ask google ("What is e6000 made of") you get this text:

"E6000 is an industrial-strength glue made from a clear drying, flexible epoxy that works well on wood, metal, glass, ceramics, rubber, vinyl, leather and (most) plastic. It dries very clear, though can form air bubbles if you're trying to use it as a sealant."

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:23 PM David Gustavson <[hidden email]> wrote:
E6000 is not an epoxy. It's a tough, flexible, glue.

-- 
  David Gustavson



On Fri, Jul 19, 2019, at 10:07 AM, Dan Shriver wrote:
E6000 seems kind of overkill since it is a specialized epoxy for high strength joins.  It also looks like it uses a chlorinated solvent so it has the same health downside as a dichloromethane solvent weld.

nop_head's suggestion of ethyl acetate for a solvent weld (with low health risk); or standard cyanoacrylate (superglue) or epoxy would probably be less expensive.

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 12:23 PM Hugo Jackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a 59ml grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my friend PLA parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any testing but I have used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that it requires a 24 hr. cure.

> On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>
> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original 'Gorilla
> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle joint.
>
> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
> at those points.
>
> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the holes
> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
> them while you do the other welds.
>
> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alex Gibson
>
>
> admg consulting
>
> edumaker limited
>
> . Project management
> . Operations & Process improvement
> . 3D Printing
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Discuss [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Bryan
> Lee
> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>
> I was just recommended this:
>
>
> Thus [hidden email] hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>
>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>
>> Carsten Arnholm
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list


_______________________________________________
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_______________________________________________
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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
In reply to this post by alexgibson
Actually a thick or gel cyanoacrylate glue may be the best glue even for
filling small gaps if you pick the right one.  Cheap superglues don't
perform particularly well, but take a look at the test results below.  This
glue test was done on wood, not PLA, but the CA glue 2P-10 was remarkably
strong even in gap filling.  Much stronger than gorilla glue---in fact, it
was the strongest glue tested in gaps, outperforming even epoxy.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoaTZY5cSQE
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1GAZrhrtJPi8-iqPRVfqgOgf7RTg8Vqmen6OKJ4Ae6_I/edit#gid=321279609

A problem with gorilla glue is that it expands into gaps by foaming, which
makes it weak.


alexgibson wrote

> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>
> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
> 'Gorilla
> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
> joint.
>
> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts together
> at those points.
>
> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
> holes
> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt through
> them while you do the other welds.
>
> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alex Gibson
>
>
> admg consulting
>
> edumaker limited
>
> . Project management
> . Operations & Process improvement
> . 3D Printing
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Discuss [mailto:

> discuss-bounces@.openscad

> ] On Behalf Of Bryan
> Lee
> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>
> I was just recommended this:
> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>
>
> Thus

> arnholm@

>  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>> > Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>
>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>
>> Carsten Arnholm
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





--
Sent from: http://forum.openscad.org/

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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
In reply to this post by boxcarmib
Other downsides to E6000 are very strong fumes (that persisted for days on a
project where I used a lot) and short shelf life once the tube is opened.
It starts to thicken in the tube and I think becomes difficult to use in a
couple months.  


boxcarmib wrote
> E6000 (labelled as an automotive & industrial) glue was recently
> recommended to me for PLA. It’s a gel like substance and It comes in a
> 59ml grey coloured tube and according to the testing conducted by my
> friend PLA parts will break before the bond does. I’ve not done any
> testing but I have used it and I’m finding it great. Only downside is that
> it requires a 24 hr. cure.
>
>> On Jul 19, 2019, at 9:07 AM, Alex Gibson &lt;

> alex@

> &gt; wrote:
>>
>> I agree the gel superglue is the best for surfaces with good contact.
>>
>> For joining parts by textured sides, I would recommend the original
>> 'Gorilla
>> glue'.  It expands slightly into the texture and makes a less brittle
>> joint.
>>
>> Another option is I use a '3d printing pen' as a welding device.  For a
>> really solid join, if you can get the internal access to the part, make a
>> grid of holes on the mating surface and 'plug weld' the two parts
>> together
>> at those points.
>>
>> You can add a couple of studs to the other side which line up with the
>> holes
>> for a fantastic alignment - or just a matching hole and put a bolt
>> through
>> them while you do the other welds.
>>
>> This is a description of the process in metal but the actions are exactly
>> the same, I just use a pastel pink '3Doodler' clone!
>> https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/plug-weld.htm
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Alex Gibson
>>
>>
>> admg consulting
>>
>> edumaker limited
>>
>> . Project management
>> . Operations & Process improvement
>> . 3D Printing
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Discuss [mailto:

> discuss-bounces@.openscad

> ] On Behalf Of Bryan
>> Lee
>> Sent: 19 July 2019 16:25
>> To: OpenSCAD general discussion
>> Subject: Re: [OpenSCAD] Joining parts
>>
>> I was just recommended this:
>> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0778LB4RX
>>
>>
>> Thus

> arnholm@

>  hast written on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 05:15:13PM
>> +0200, and, according to prophecy, it shall come to pass that:
>>> On 2019-07-19 16:40, Bryan Lee wrote:
>>>> Other than that, I've used Cyanoacrylate/superglue to glue PLA.
>>>
>>> Thanks for the replies. I was mostly interested in something easily
>>> available and superglue fits the bill.
>>>
>>> Carsten Arnholm
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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