Joining parts

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Joining parts

DanS
I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.

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Re: Joining parts

nophead
To make things a friction fit I generally print the male and female parts exactly the same size and rely on the layer ridges to lock them together. I printed thousands of these  https://github.com/nophead/Mendel90/blob/master/dibond/stls/printed/spool_holder_brackets.stl and pressed them together in a wood work vice. The ends of the male pegs are chamfered for one layer to make it easier to insert them.

Only yesterday I printed the round grommet shown here and pressed the two halves together. It does require very accurate printing though. I only use single outlines. It is hard to get multiple outlines to give the exact dimensions.

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 20:38, Dan Shriver <[hidden email]> wrote:
I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.
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Re: Joining parts

acwest
If you have ever seen the geared cube print, it is held together by a fairly clever peg and socket system. I took the original, and made it much more configurable in openSCAD. The pins are spring loaded, and give a very solid connection.

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019, 16:33 nop head, <[hidden email]> wrote:
To make things a friction fit I generally print the male and female parts exactly the same size and rely on the layer ridges to lock them together. I printed thousands of these  https://github.com/nophead/Mendel90/blob/master/dibond/stls/printed/spool_holder_brackets.stl and pressed them together in a wood work vice. The ends of the male pegs are chamfered for one layer to make it easier to insert them.

Only yesterday I printed the round grommet shown here and pressed the two halves together. It does require very accurate printing though. I only use single outlines. It is hard to get multiple outlines to give the exact dimensions.

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 at 20:38, Dan Shriver <[hidden email]> wrote:
I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.
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Re: Joining parts

adrianv
In reply to this post by DanS
I think I saw a design for prints to interface with LEGOS.  

The one time so far that I've done this I used tapered sliding dovetails.
For my design I didn't care if the joint lined up and I figured the taper
would absorb errors in the print.  However, in my print the joint went
together a little too far, whereas some others who printed my design on
different hardware reported having to persuade it together with a hammer.  
But I still think the sliding dovetail is a good idea.  

We had a recent discussion here about snap hinges.  

You don't indicate in your question what the geometry of your connection is,
which might affect the types of joint that make sense.  If you can use glue
you can do a puzzle-cut type approach to divide your model into parts.  




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Re: Joining parts

discuss
In reply to this post by DanS
Finally something I can contribute too...maybe....

I print mostly on a Resin Printer...so not much for layer lines....I have
found (and you will have to conduct some tests on your equipment) that a
friction fit can be achieved with anything less than about .2 mm clearance.
What I did was create a ring with a fixed size inner bore....I think I used
10mm...be sure the ring is thick walled so there is no flex and normal
shrinkage happens....then I created a series of small inserts, basically
cylinders with a little allen key hole in the middle...each cylinder was one
(pixel, spot size whatever the minimum resolution your printer uses) bigger
than the next..I started two sizes smaller than the ring inner diameter and
several larger in one step increments.  While the smaller ones should not
ever fit you never know.  Once things are clean and cool I inserted the
cylinders into the ring...I used the allen key just to rotate to judge
binding...you will need something to poke out the tight ones.  Also I
suggest printing some sort of indicator on the cylinder top that tells what
size it is so you don't get them mixed up while testing....I just used bumps
to indicate the step sizes.

I have printed several items using friction fits similar to lego and also
some sliding guides that must slide but not be sloppy and even a few round
bearing type parts.  So far what I learned on my ring and insert test served
well...the only issue is some care in orientation is warranted as not all
orientations result in identical prints...but just print a ring set that
matches how you need to print the final parts....Also on a Resin machine the
resin type / brand matters when you want those really perfect fits you have
to test.

With FDM printers overhangs tend to close up spacing and for me at least
inner diameter holes tend to run small while outer are mostly right on.  I
often have to make a few runs to get the friction I want...but lego printing
works pretty well once you dial it in...even print speed can affect the
final product.



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Re: Joining parts

RayBellis
In reply to this post by DanS


On 18/07/2019 20:37, Dan Shriver wrote:

> I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.
>
> Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction
> fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be
> something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does
> anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?
>
> I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build
> volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard
> for me to inspect.
>

For 90 degree folded "living hinges" with retention clips see my recent
thread at:

<http://forum.openscad.org/Latching-clips-for-folded-pieces-td26577.html>

Oddly, I found that while this worked fine with the reel of Prusa PLA
that I got with my printer, when I tried it recently with a year-old
reel of cheaper "Suntu" brand from Amazon I found that the parts
wouldn't fit, causing the pegs to just snap off.

I bought a reel of "ANYCUBIC" PLA instead, and that works much better.

Ray



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Re: Joining parts

acwest
You need a filament dryer

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019, 17:31 , <[hidden email]> wrote:


On 18/07/2019 20:37, Dan Shriver wrote:
> I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.
>
> Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction
> fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be
> something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does
> anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?
>
> I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build
> volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard
> for me to inspect.
>

For 90 degree folded "living hinges" with retention clips see my recent
thread at:

<http://forum.openscad.org/Latching-clips-for-folded-pieces-td26577.html>

Oddly, I found that while this worked fine with the reel of Prusa PLA
that I got with my printer, when I tried it recently with a year-old
reel of cheaper "Suntu" brand from Amazon I found that the parts
wouldn't fit, causing the pegs to just snap off.

I bought a reel of "ANYCUBIC" PLA instead, and that works much better.

Ray



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Parts breaking - was Re: Joining parts

RayBellis


On 18/07/2019 22:52, A. Craig West wrote:

> You need a filament dryer

Maybe, although the printer and my filament is in a low humidity
conservatory that easily hits 40C on a summers day.

The Prusa PLA I have is much older than the Suntu, too, and that still
works fine.

(The one thing I do ensure is that there's no direct sunlight on the
printer or PLA)

Ray

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Re: Parts breaking - was Re: Joining parts

acwest
Does the old filament string more than usual? That was the first sign I had of excessive water content. The stuff is exceedingly hydrophilic 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019, 18:10 , <[hidden email]> wrote:


On 18/07/2019 22:52, A. Craig West wrote:

> You need a filament dryer

Maybe, although the printer and my filament is in a low humidity
conservatory that easily hits 40C on a summers day.

The Prusa PLA I have is much older than the Suntu, too, and that still
works fine.

(The one thing I do ensure is that there's no direct sunlight on the
printer or PLA)

Ray

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Re: Parts breaking - was Re: Joining parts

adrianv
I've been storing my filament in airtight boxes with a bag of desiccant in
each one.  It seems to get the humidity under 20% in each box and 8 lbs of
desiccant beads cost less than US$20.  


acwest wrote
> Does the old filament string more than usual? That was the first sign I
> had
> of excessive water content. The stuff is exceedingly hydrophilic
>
> On Thu, 18 Jul 2019, 18:10 , &lt;

> openscad@.me

> &gt; wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> On 18/07/2019 22:52, A. Craig West wrote:
>>
>> > You need a filament dryer
>>
>> Maybe, although the printer and my filament is in a low humidity
>> conservatory that easily hits 40C on a summers day.
>>
>> The Prusa PLA I have is much older than the Suntu, too, and that still
>> works fine.
>>
>> (The one thing I do ensure is that there's no direct sunlight on the
>> printer or PLA)
>>
>> Ray
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> OpenSCAD mailing list
>>

> Discuss@.openscad

>> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list

> Discuss@.openscad

> http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org





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Re: Joining parts

JordanBrown
In reply to this post by DanS
I can't say I have a lot of experience with it, but this article describes a scheme that makes sense to me:

https://makezine.com/2015/07/22/tips-3d-printing-press-fit-parts/


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Re: Joining parts

RevarBat
In reply to this post by DanS
I designed and printed the world's most 3d-printable 3d printer using snap-together joiners I designed myself.  The printer is make out of a bunch of parts designed to be printed in a 150 x 150 x 150mm print volume.I added the joiners to my BOSL library if you want to use them.


- Revar



On Jul 18, 2019, at 12:37 PM, Dan Shriver <[hidden email]> wrote:

I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.
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Re: Joining parts

DanS
In reply to this post by adrianv
"You don't indicate in your question what the geometry of your connection is,
which might affect the types of joint that make sense.  If you can use glue
you can do a puzzle-cut type approach to divide your model into parts.  "

I didn't mention the geometry of my model for multiple reasons:
1) I'm thinking of this as a general solution to a general problem
2) the current model that I want to apply it to is very "odd-looking" so it is hard to describe

I don't want to use glue I prefer something that (like with legos) can be snapped together and apart.  Examining parts (as well as the whole model put together) could be useful.

On Thu, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:50 PM adrianv <[hidden email]> wrote:
I think I saw a design for prints to interface with LEGOS. 

The one time so far that I've done this I used tapered sliding dovetails.
For my design I didn't care if the joint lined up and I figured the taper
would absorb errors in the print.  However, in my print the joint went
together a little too far, whereas some others who printed my design on
different hardware reported having to persuade it together with a hammer. 
But I still think the sliding dovetail is a good idea. 

We had a recent discussion here about snap hinges. 

You don't indicate in your question what the geometry of your connection is,
which might affect the types of joint that make sense.  If you can use glue
you can do a puzzle-cut type approach to divide your model into parts. 




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Re: Joining parts

Juan C.Cilleruelo
In reply to this post by DanS

I want to recommend you this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Functional-Design-3D-Printing-Designing/dp/0692883215/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2C5SQTATLJTB4&keywords=functional+design+for+3d+printing&qid=1563518323&s=gateway&sprefix=functional+design+%2Caps%2C209&sr=8-1

Inside it, you have all the necessary knowledge to make what you want.

It's not a book centred on a concrete design tool, otherwise is a generic theoric book about 3D printing and how to design good things that really are going to work in real work.

The book has a good part dedicated to assembling parts.

On 18/07/2019 21:37, Dan Shriver wrote:
I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.

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Re: Joining parts

frankv
I know you're looking for purely 3d printed solutions, but sometimes it's just easier to glue things together.  In those circumstances I design matching 2mm holes into the parts. Then glue short pieces of 1.75mm filament into one set of holes to function as alignment pins for assembling the parts.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019, 18:47 Juan C.Cilleruelo, <[hidden email]> wrote:

I want to recommend you this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Functional-Design-3D-Printing-Designing/dp/0692883215/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2C5SQTATLJTB4&keywords=functional+design+for+3d+printing&qid=1563518323&s=gateway&sprefix=functional+design+%2Caps%2C209&sr=8-1

Inside it, you have all the necessary knowledge to make what you want.

It's not a book centred on a concrete design tool, otherwise is a generic theoric book about 3D printing and how to design good things that really are going to work in real work.

The book has a good part dedicated to assembling parts.

On 18/07/2019 21:37, Dan Shriver wrote:
I am looking on having a discussion on joining printed parts.

Basically, I am looking to see if people have suggestions on friction fit methods for joining parts together (like legos do).  It could be something you brewed up yourself or something you found elsewhere.  Does anyone have friction fit joining mechanisms they like?

I am looking for this because if I print a whole model inside the build volume of a makerbot I'm going to end up with a tiny model that is hard for me to inspect.

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extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Juan C.Cilleruelo
In reply to this post by DanS
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

nophead
All those statements are true. To export and import 2D shapes you need to use a 2D format like DXF or SVG.

You can convert a 3D shape to 2D with projection(), so if you have a flat object in an STL file you can make it 2D and then linear_extrude it.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:04, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Juan C.Cilleruelo

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }




On 19/07/2019 09:11, nop head wrote:
All those statements are true. To export and import 2D shapes you need to use a 2D format like DXF or SVG.

You can convert a 3D shape to 2D with projection(), so if you have a flat object in an STL file you can make it 2D and then linear_extrude it.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:04, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

Juan C.Cilleruelo
In reply to this post by nophead

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }

On 19/07/2019 09:11, nop head wrote:
All those statements are true. To export and import 2D shapes you need to use a 2D format like DXF or SVG.

You can convert a 3D shape to 2D with projection(), so if you have a flat object in an STL file you can make it 2D and then linear_extrude it.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:04, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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Re: extruding plain draws or saving plain draws into STL files.

nophead
Glad to help! 

I can see why you needed it now. Where did you get the profile STL from?

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:43, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thank you very much!!!!

It's just what I looking for!!!



/*----------  PROFILE 20X20 => ALUMINIUM PROFILE 20x20  ----------*/         
   linear_extrude(height = 40, center = false, convexity = 10, twist = 0){
      projection(){  
        import("PROFILE20X20_001.stl");
      }
   }

On 19/07/2019 09:11, nop head wrote:
All those statements are true. To export and import 2D shapes you need to use a 2D format like DXF or SVG.

You can convert a 3D shape to 2D with projection(), so if you have a flat object in an STL file you can make it 2D and then linear_extrude it.

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 at 08:04, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've discovered the next thing in OpenSCAD and I want to know if it's a
logical situation or is a limitation or if it's a bug behaviour.

1st : I can't use linear_extrude() with modules that use 3D
instructions, only with those that use exclusively 2D instructions.

2nd: I can't export to STL a drawing that uses exclusively 2D instructions.

if I want to generate an STL file with only 2D instructions, I need to
apply at least a 0.1 of linear_extrusion to the drawing.

3rd: As a consequence of the first, I can't use linear_extrude() to
extrude an imported STL, because its content is always in 3D.

Did anyone know a tip or trick to save 2D drawings into an STL and to
extrude an STL file imported?

Thank you all in advance!






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