I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

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I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

Juan C.Cilleruelo
I want to collaborate in the development of OpenSCAD, but I can't find a good
guide to mount the development environment over an open-source or free IDE.

I prefer Windows environment but I'm open to developing with XCode or any
other good IDE on Linux.

Can anyone help me with the steps I need to do to start developing new
features in OpenSCAD?

Thanks in advance to all the group!



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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

nophead
On Windows you can use the free version of Microsoft Visual Studio.

On Sun, 8 Dec 2019 at 12:00, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I want to collaborate in the development of OpenSCAD, but I can't find a good
guide to mount the development environment over an open-source or free IDE.

I prefer Windows environment but I'm open to developing with XCode or any
other good IDE on Linux.

Can anyone help me with the steps I need to do to start developing new
features in OpenSCAD?

Thanks in advance to all the group!



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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

Juan C.Cilleruelo

Microsoft Visual Studio Community, maybe?

On 08/12/2019 13:12, nop head wrote:
On Windows you can use the free version of Microsoft Visual Studio.

On Sun, 8 Dec 2019 at 12:00, Juan C.Cilleruelo <[hidden email]> wrote:
I want to collaborate in the development of OpenSCAD, but I can't find a good
guide to mount the development environment over an open-source or free IDE.

I prefer Windows environment but I'm open to developing with XCode or any
other good IDE on Linux.

Can anyone help me with the steps I need to do to start developing new
features in OpenSCAD?

Thanks in advance to all the group!



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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

MichaelPFrey
In reply to this post by Juan C.Cilleruelo
On 08.12.19 13:15, Juan C.Cilleruelo wrote:
> I want to collaborate in the development of OpenSCAD, but I can't find a good
> guide to mount the development environment over an open-source or free IDE.
>
> I prefer Windows environment but I'm open to developing with XCode or any
> other good IDE on Linux.
>
Honestly, under Linux I mainly use Geany (which just the first text
editor I used under Ubuntu - not a careful decision) and the shell, no IDE.

There are things like the automated test framework or the translation
automation that, to my knowledge, are not preconfigured to be used with
any IDE. (But they are straightforward to use via command line, so I
guess that could be bound somehow).

There also is, in my opinion, also no nice git shell extension/GUI, so
just started to use it via shell - at which point the shell was always
open and the most used commands just a few up arrow key presses away.
(There are not many commmands that I needed regularly. Some where
chained - e.g. qmake && make -j7 && ./openscad)

Some times I used to use QT creator under both Linux and Windows. It
does the job, but I do not love it -  QT creator feels kind of
heavy/slow on my machine. QT Designer is required for some works on the
GUI. But in the end, I personally preferred to use command line under
linux most of the time simply because I guess the documentation for it
is the easiest to understand/follow/debug (especially when the automated
builds during PR fail).

 From what I experienced about the Windows build chain is, that
understanding the Linux build chain helps a lot, as compiling under
Windows uses qmake and gcc (at least back then - things can have changed
in the mean time).

With kind regards,

Michael Frey


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tp3
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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

tp3
I'm using NetBeans which has quite usable C++ support, even
though it currently still needs an older plugin to be used.
That should work on any platform, but I have only used it
myself on Linux.

Visual Studio support is currently a bit limited, there's
an issue on Github listing what is needed for native VC++
compilation (getting that fully working would be awesome).
I suspect it will be possible to use the MSYS2 build env
too with some configuration.

There's also Visual Studio Code which is supposed to have
quite some development integration, so I guess it's somewhere
between just a text editor and a dedicated IDE.

I've never really used any of the other options like
KDevelop, GnomeBuilder, Eclipse, Cevelop, QtCreator,
Code::Blocks, CLion (not sure if the first 2 have a Windows
version though).

In the end it's more about finding something one is
comfortable with, OpenSCAD does not impose much restrictions
on what's used except for the GUI-Designer but that is
a separate tool anyway.

ciao,
  Torsten.

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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

thehans
Hello Juan,

First step would be to see if you can compile the project.

I worked on a Microsoft Visual Studio compatible build process a while ago (using the Community Edition).  See the notes in this issue for some steps to follow: https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2814
VIsual Studio Community has integrated support for CMake so the build process makes use of that, plus using "vcpkg" for library management.  

Last time I tried, building the main executable (but not the tests suite) was fully functioning, although that was a while ago and its possible that something has changed and broken that process.
Keep in mind that qmake is still the current "official" OpenSCAD build tool, and cmake is an alternate/secondary means of building.  This means the CI servers don't automatically test that its functioning and so it does not always get updates needed, for example when new libraries or source files are added to the project, causing it to possibly break from time to time.  I do test out the cmake build *on Linux* fairly regularly and patch it up whenever I notice something missing, but I haven't been specifically maintaining the Windows build.  There is a plan to eventually move away from qmake, and have cmake replace it as the single official build tool.  There are a couple issues for tracking that and I'm honestly not sure what the next expected step is anymore.

Since I use Linux from day to day, and haven't looked at the MSVC native WIndows build in a while: if you are interested in continuing the effort of fixing/documenting that build process, that would be very helpful!  

The issue for that is still open here:  https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2857  , which continues the work from #2814 linked above.

Cheers,
Hans


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 8:23 AM Torsten Paul <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm using NetBeans which has quite usable C++ support, even
though it currently still needs an older plugin to be used.
That should work on any platform, but I have only used it
myself on Linux.

Visual Studio support is currently a bit limited, there's
an issue on Github listing what is needed for native VC++
compilation (getting that fully working would be awesome).
I suspect it will be possible to use the MSYS2 build env
too with some configuration.

There's also Visual Studio Code which is supposed to have
quite some development integration, so I guess it's somewhere
between just a text editor and a dedicated IDE.

I've never really used any of the other options like
KDevelop, GnomeBuilder, Eclipse, Cevelop, QtCreator,
Code::Blocks, CLion (not sure if the first 2 have a Windows
version though).

In the end it's more about finding something one is
comfortable with, OpenSCAD does not impose much restrictions
on what's used except for the GUI-Designer but that is
a separate tool anyway.

ciao,
  Torsten.

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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

thehans
Hello Juan,

Just checking in, curious how things are going.  Have you had any success with building OpenSCAD on Windows?  

Let me know if you have any specific questions or if there's any way I can help.  We could really use a Windows-based developer if you are still interested.

Oh and Merry Christmas :)
Hans


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 1:31 PM Hans L <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello Juan,

First step would be to see if you can compile the project.

I worked on a Microsoft Visual Studio compatible build process a while ago (using the Community Edition).  See the notes in this issue for some steps to follow: https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2814
VIsual Studio Community has integrated support for CMake so the build process makes use of that, plus using "vcpkg" for library management.  

Last time I tried, building the main executable (but not the tests suite) was fully functioning, although that was a while ago and its possible that something has changed and broken that process.
Keep in mind that qmake is still the current "official" OpenSCAD build tool, and cmake is an alternate/secondary means of building.  This means the CI servers don't automatically test that its functioning and so it does not always get updates needed, for example when new libraries or source files are added to the project, causing it to possibly break from time to time.  I do test out the cmake build *on Linux* fairly regularly and patch it up whenever I notice something missing, but I haven't been specifically maintaining the Windows build.  There is a plan to eventually move away from qmake, and have cmake replace it as the single official build tool.  There are a couple issues for tracking that and I'm honestly not sure what the next expected step is anymore.

Since I use Linux from day to day, and haven't looked at the MSVC native WIndows build in a while: if you are interested in continuing the effort of fixing/documenting that build process, that would be very helpful!  

The issue for that is still open here:  https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2857  , which continues the work from #2814 linked above.

Cheers,
Hans


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 8:23 AM Torsten Paul <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm using NetBeans which has quite usable C++ support, even
though it currently still needs an older plugin to be used.
That should work on any platform, but I have only used it
myself on Linux.

Visual Studio support is currently a bit limited, there's
an issue on Github listing what is needed for native VC++
compilation (getting that fully working would be awesome).
I suspect it will be possible to use the MSYS2 build env
too with some configuration.

There's also Visual Studio Code which is supposed to have
quite some development integration, so I guess it's somewhere
between just a text editor and a dedicated IDE.

I've never really used any of the other options like
KDevelop, GnomeBuilder, Eclipse, Cevelop, QtCreator,
Code::Blocks, CLion (not sure if the first 2 have a Windows
version though).

In the end it's more about finding something one is
comfortable with, OpenSCAD does not impose much restrictions
on what's used except for the GUI-Designer but that is
a separate tool anyway.

ciao,
  Torsten.

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Re: I want to collaborate: Which IDE is preferable for Windows. QT Create, maybe?

Juan C.Cilleruelo

I'm very interested in collaborating. But I have a problem. Mount the development environment with and IDE that is not the IDE you use daily, is a barrier task. This is, I need a very cost inversion of time to accomplish this first task.

One time I have this environment working, the task of programming or made fixes in the code, can be a simple task.

I really don't have a lot of time to waste. Is because of this, that if someone can help me with a little guide, step by step, on how to mount the environment over the MS IDE, I'm going to be very grateful.

Thanks!

On 25/12/2019 18:22, Hans L wrote:
Hello Juan,

Just checking in, curious how things are going.  Have you had any success with building OpenSCAD on Windows?  

Let me know if you have any specific questions or if there's any way I can help.  We could really use a Windows-based developer if you are still interested.

Oh and Merry Christmas :)
Hans


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 1:31 PM Hans L <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello Juan,

First step would be to see if you can compile the project.

I worked on a Microsoft Visual Studio compatible build process a while ago (using the Community Edition).  See the notes in this issue for some steps to follow: https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2814
VIsual Studio Community has integrated support for CMake so the build process makes use of that, plus using "vcpkg" for library management.  

Last time I tried, building the main executable (but not the tests suite) was fully functioning, although that was a while ago and its possible that something has changed and broken that process.
Keep in mind that qmake is still the current "official" OpenSCAD build tool, and cmake is an alternate/secondary means of building.  This means the CI servers don't automatically test that its functioning and so it does not always get updates needed, for example when new libraries or source files are added to the project, causing it to possibly break from time to time.  I do test out the cmake build *on Linux* fairly regularly and patch it up whenever I notice something missing, but I haven't been specifically maintaining the Windows build.  There is a plan to eventually move away from qmake, and have cmake replace it as the single official build tool.  There are a couple issues for tracking that and I'm honestly not sure what the next expected step is anymore.

Since I use Linux from day to day, and haven't looked at the MSVC native WIndows build in a while: if you are interested in continuing the effort of fixing/documenting that build process, that would be very helpful!  

The issue for that is still open here:  https://github.com/openscad/openscad/issues/2857  , which continues the work from #2814 linked above.

Cheers,
Hans


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 8:23 AM Torsten Paul <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm using NetBeans which has quite usable C++ support, even
though it currently still needs an older plugin to be used.
That should work on any platform, but I have only used it
myself on Linux.

Visual Studio support is currently a bit limited, there's
an issue on Github listing what is needed for native VC++
compilation (getting that fully working would be awesome).
I suspect it will be possible to use the MSYS2 build env
too with some configuration.

There's also Visual Studio Code which is supposed to have
quite some development integration, so I guess it's somewhere
between just a text editor and a dedicated IDE.

I've never really used any of the other options like
KDevelop, GnomeBuilder, Eclipse, Cevelop, QtCreator,
Code::Blocks, CLion (not sure if the first 2 have a Windows
version though).

In the end it's more about finding something one is
comfortable with, OpenSCAD does not impose much restrictions
on what's used except for the GUI-Designer but that is
a separate tool anyway.

ciao,
  Torsten.

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http://lists.openscad.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss_lists.openscad.org

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