3D Printer

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3D Printer

Derek Stewart
Hi,

Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.

Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
--
Regards,

Derek
_______________________________________________
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http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

jon_bondy
What are your requirements, in terms of cost and build volume?  Do you
want to purchase a fully built printer, build a kit, or build one
yourself out of printed parts and off-the-shelf parts that you
purchase?  Are you happy just printing PLA, or do you want/need to print
ABS and/or Nylon?

Current printer designs often have printed parts, and those parts are
modeled using a variety of tools, including OpenSCAD.

This might be best dealt with off of this forum, since it is not really
on topic.

Jon

On 5/21/2014 9:11 AM, Derek Stewart wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
tp3
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Re: 3D Printer

tp3
In reply to this post by Derek Stewart
Derek Stewart wrote
Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
Yes, some quite impressive examples are shown here: http://www.openscad.org/gallery.html
-- Torsten
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Re: 3D Printer

Robert Jaquiss
In reply to this post by Derek Stewart
Hello:

     I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.

3d Printing for beginners
http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/

3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
http://www.3ders.org/

Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
http://www.makezine.com/

Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
http://www.makershed.com/


I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.

Regards,

Robert

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer

Hi,

Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.

Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
--
Regards,

Derek
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

Derek Stewart
Hi,

Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
straying from the List Topic.

But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.

I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
Printer.

Looks like I am in the wrong place.

Regards,

Derek

On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:

> Hello:
>
>       I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>
> 3d Printing for beginners
> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>
> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
> http://www.3ders.org/
>
> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
> http://www.makezine.com/
>
> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
> http://www.makershed.com/
>
>
> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>
> Regards,
>
> Robert
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>
> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
RGH
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Re: 3D Printer

RGH
Derek - OpenSCAD can certainly produce files that can be used for 3D printing.

 Although they first have to be "sliced" before the printer can use them.

There are several parts for 3D printers that have been designed using OpenSCAD.

Look on Thingiverse.

However this forum is really for the modelling software, and how to make models, not for 3D printing per se.

In some respects your question was like asking what the best printer is, on a Microsoft Office forum. Office certainly outputs to a printer ... but that's not what the forum is about or for. On the other hand if you wanted to know how to adjust the formatting etc, then it would be the right place to go.

Personally I use an Ultimaker 2 and love it. I would concur that if you don't have a great deal of experience building stuff (and/or don;t have the appropriate tools) then your best bet is to buy a readymade printer. Or at the very least a very easy kit. There are a number of reasonably cheap options out there these days,but the best place to get the info is on 3D printer sites like he ones that have already been mentioned.

One important thing I would say is that home/hobby 3D printing technology is evolving so fast that it is completely pointless to read articles or reviews that are more than about 6-12 months old.

Robert



On Wed, May 21, 2014 at 1:43 PM, Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,

Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
straying from the List Topic.

But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.

I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
Printer.

Looks like I am in the wrong place.

Regards,

Derek

On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
> Hello:
>
>       I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>
> 3d Printing for beginners
> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>
> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
> http://www.3ders.org/
>
> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
> http://www.makezine.com/
>
> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
> http://www.makershed.com/
>
>
> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>
> Regards,
>
> Robert
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>
> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566



--
----------------------------------------------------

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

Kenneth Sloan
Here’s how I use OpenSCAD for 3D printing…


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 21, 2014, at 12:57 , Robert Harris <[hidden email]> wrote:

Derek - OpenSCAD can certainly produce files that can be used for 3D printing.

 Although they first have to be "sliced" before the printer can use them.

There are several parts for 3D printers that have been designed using OpenSCAD.

Look on Thingiverse.

However this forum is really for the modelling software, and how to make models, not for 3D printing per se.

In some respects your question was like asking what the best printer is, on a Microsoft Office forum. Office certainly outputs to a printer ... but that's not what the forum is about or for. On the other hand if you wanted to know how to adjust the formatting etc, then it would be the right place to go.

Personally I use an Ultimaker 2 and love it. I would concur that if you don't have a great deal of experience building stuff (and/or don;t have the appropriate tools) then your best bet is to buy a readymade printer. Or at the very least a very easy kit. There are a number of reasonably cheap options out there these days,but the best place to get the info is on 3D printer sites like he ones that have already been mentioned.

One important thing I would say is that home/hobby 3D printing technology is evolving so fast that it is completely pointless to read articles or reviews that are more than about 6-12 months old.

Robert



On Wed, May 21, 2014 at 1:43 PM, Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,

Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
straying from the List Topic.

But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.

I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
Printer.

Looks like I am in the wrong place.

Regards,

Derek

On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
> Hello:
>
>       I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>
> 3d Printing for beginners
> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>
> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
> http://www.3ders.org/
>
> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
> http://www.makezine.com/
>
> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
> http://www.makershed.com/
>
>
> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>
> Regards,
>
> Robert
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>
> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566



--
----------------------------------------------------
_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

Kenneth Sloan
In reply to this post by Derek Stewart
Not at all.

It depends on your printer.

OpenSCAD can “produce the 3D model” and output it as an .stl file.
Many printers come with proprietary (or not)
software which will read .stl files and “send the job to the printer”.

The workflow for many of the users of my 3DPrintLab consists of:

a) OpenSCAD -> .stl
b) netfabb (free download) to verify and perhaps repair the model
c) proprietary printer software (either MakerBot or StrataSys printers)

c) varies, depending on the target printer

b) is constant - this is a very useful sanity check

a) varies all over the lot.  There are a plethora of 3D design tools - OpenSCAD
    is the one I recommend to beginners.  The basic requirement is that the
    3D design tool can (by hook, or by crook) produce .stl files.

My lab accepts .stl files as the default input format.  We can handle other formats,
but we charge extra for that.  We run everything past netfabb (if repair is necessary,
we do that…and charge extra).  And, of course, we feed the (verified) .stl to
the appropriate proprietary printer software.

So - yes…OpenSCAD is worth your attention as a way to create 3D models.  What you
do next depends on your printer.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 21, 2014, at 12:43 , Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
> straying from the List Topic.
>
> But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.
>
> I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
> Printer.
>
> Looks like I am in the wrong place.
>
> Regards,
>
> Derek
>
> On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
>> Hello:
>>
>>      I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>>
>> 3d Printing for beginners
>> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>>
>> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
>> http://www.3ders.org/
>>
>> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
>> http://www.makezine.com/
>>
>> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
>> http://www.makershed.com/
>>
>>
>> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
>> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>>
>> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

drxenocide
I built mine from a kit. I got the hardware working but my software still doesn't work. It took me about 40 hours to get it built, and I put in 40 hours of troubleshooting (mostly software) before I mostly gave up. It is a VERY difficult project to build from scratch. Looking back, I should have ponied up the extra $300-600 and bought an assembled printer.


On Wed, May 21, 2014 at 2:35 PM, Kenneth Sloan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Not at all.

It depends on your printer.

OpenSCAD can “produce the 3D model” and output it as an .stl file.
Many printers come with proprietary (or not)
software which will read .stl files and “send the job to the printer”.

The workflow for many of the users of my 3DPrintLab consists of:

a) OpenSCAD -> .stl
b) netfabb (free download) to verify and perhaps repair the model
c) proprietary printer software (either MakerBot or StrataSys printers)

c) varies, depending on the target printer

b) is constant - this is a very useful sanity check

a) varies all over the lot.  There are a plethora of 3D design tools - OpenSCAD
    is the one I recommend to beginners.  The basic requirement is that the
    3D design tool can (by hook, or by crook) produce .stl files.

My lab accepts .stl files as the default input format.  We can handle other formats,
but we charge extra for that.  We run everything past netfabb (if repair is necessary,
we do that…and charge extra).  And, of course, we feed the (verified) .stl to
the appropriate proprietary printer software.

So - yes…OpenSCAD is worth your attention as a way to create 3D models.  What you
do next depends on your printer.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 21, 2014, at 12:43 , Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
> straying from the List Topic.
>
> But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.
>
> I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
> Printer.
>
> Looks like I am in the wrong place.
>
> Regards,
>
> Derek
>
> On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
>> Hello:
>>
>>      I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>>
>> 3d Printing for beginners
>> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>>
>> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
>> http://www.3ders.org/
>>
>> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
>> http://www.makezine.com/
>>
>> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
>> http://www.makershed.com/
>>
>>
>> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
>> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>>
>> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

Joseph Lenox
In reply to this post by Kenneth Sloan

Your question is better suited for either the irc channel  #reprap on freenode, or the reprap forums (google!) or the reprap wiki. 

On May 21, 2014 1:35 PM, "Kenneth Sloan" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Not at all.

It depends on your printer.

OpenSCAD can “produce the 3D model” and output it as an .stl file.
Many printers come with proprietary (or not)
software which will read .stl files and “send the job to the printer”.

The workflow for many of the users of my 3DPrintLab consists of:

a) OpenSCAD -> .stl
b) netfabb (free download) to verify and perhaps repair the model
c) proprietary printer software (either MakerBot or StrataSys printers)

c) varies, depending on the target printer

b) is constant - this is a very useful sanity check

a) varies all over the lot.  There are a plethora of 3D design tools - OpenSCAD
    is the one I recommend to beginners.  The basic requirement is that the
    3D design tool can (by hook, or by crook) produce .stl files.

My lab accepts .stl files as the default input format.  We can handle other formats,
but we charge extra for that.  We run everything past netfabb (if repair is necessary,
we do that…and charge extra).  And, of course, we feed the (verified) .stl to
the appropriate proprietary printer software.

So - yes…OpenSCAD is worth your attention as a way to create 3D models.  What you
do next depends on your printer.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 21, 2014, at 12:43 , Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
> straying from the List Topic.
>
> But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.
>
> I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
> Printer.
>
> Looks like I am in the wrong place.
>
> Regards,
>
> Derek
>
> On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
>> Hello:
>>
>>      I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>>
>> 3d Printing for beginners
>> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>>
>> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
>> http://www.3ders.org/
>>
>> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
>> http://www.makezine.com/
>>
>> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
>> http://www.makershed.com/
>>
>>
>> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
>> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>>
>> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566
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Re: 3D Printer

drxenocide
Thanks guys. Wasn't trying to deviate the thread, just giving my rationale for my opinion of kits. Thanks for the responses though - I've been to #reprap and the forums, and I'm pretty sure I haven't tried hard enough to fix it. But maybe when I'm ready to give it another real shot, Ill start another thread.


On Wed, May 21, 2014 at 5:18 PM, Joseph Lenox <[hidden email]> wrote:

Your question is better suited for either the irc channel  #reprap on freenode, or the reprap forums (google!) or the reprap wiki. 

On May 21, 2014 1:35 PM, "Kenneth Sloan" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Not at all.

It depends on your printer.

OpenSCAD can “produce the 3D model” and output it as an .stl file.
Many printers come with proprietary (or not)
software which will read .stl files and “send the job to the printer”.

The workflow for many of the users of my 3DPrintLab consists of:

a) OpenSCAD -> .stl
b) netfabb (free download) to verify and perhaps repair the model
c) proprietary printer software (either MakerBot or StrataSys printers)

c) varies, depending on the target printer

b) is constant - this is a very useful sanity check

a) varies all over the lot.  There are a plethora of 3D design tools - OpenSCAD
    is the one I recommend to beginners.  The basic requirement is that the
    3D design tool can (by hook, or by crook) produce .stl files.

My lab accepts .stl files as the default input format.  We can handle other formats,
but we charge extra for that.  We run everything past netfabb (if repair is necessary,
we do that…and charge extra).  And, of course, we feed the (verified) .stl to
the appropriate proprietary printer software.

So - yes…OpenSCAD is worth your attention as a way to create 3D models.  What you
do next depends on your printer.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 21, 2014, at 12:43 , Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Thanks for the information, I am sorry that you all think this is
> straying from the List Topic.
>
> But I only found out about OpenSCAD through looking at 3D Printer Web Site.
>
> I thought that OpenSCAD could produce the 3D model and send it to a 3D
> Printer.
>
> Looks like I am in the wrong place.
>
> Regards,
>
> Derek
>
> On 21/05/14 18:26, Robert Jaquiss wrote:
>> Hello:
>>
>>      I know this is seriously straying from the topic of this list, but here are a few sites.
>>
>> 3d Printing for beginners
>> http://3dprintingforbeginners.com/
>>
>> 3ders.org - 3D printer and 3D printing news, trends and resources.
>> http://www.3ders.org/
>>
>> Make Zine  an online magazine for makers
>> http://www.makezine.com/
>>
>> Maker Shed  A source of kits and supplies.
>> http://www.makershed.com/
>>
>>
>> I suggest that unless you are a very skilled hobbyist, you avoid trying to build a 3d printer from scratch. Kits are a better option, but I would rather pull a unit from a box, load filament and start printing.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Robert
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Derek Stewart
>> Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:11 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: [OpenSCAD] 3D Printer
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>>
>> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.
>>
> _______________________________________________
> OpenSCAD mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
> http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566

_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
[hidden email]
http://rocklinux.net/mailman/listinfo/openscad
http://openscad.org - https://flattr.com/thing/121566


_______________________________________________
OpenSCAD mailing list
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Re: 3D Printer

Alan Cox
In reply to this post by Kenneth Sloan
> a) OpenSCAD -> .stl
> b) netfabb (free download) to verify and perhaps repair the model
> c) proprietary printer software (either MakerBot or StrataSys printers)

I almost never use b) these days. Modern OpenSCAD is both pretty good at
generating valid objects in the first place and usually knows itself when
it's got a problem.

The big problem with OpenSCAD I find is that people take the OpenSCAD
output and run it through s**tware convertors to stl float formats that
don't do proper disambiguation. Sadly there seem to be a lot of them
about and some of the printer tools only accept float format, or do
broken float conversions and wreck your mesh.

Alan


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Re: 3D Printer

Alan Cox
In reply to this post by Derek Stewart
On Wed, 21 May 2014 14:11:18 +0100
Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.

Only comments I'd add given this has been answered already:

I spent some time carefully analysing it having part built a printer for
fun when the rest of life interfered. Once I took time and hassle into
account I couldn't make owning a printer beat just using Shapeways, even
for a preassembled printer, even if someone handed me a free rep-rap
style printer.

(Not that for the most part IMHO a pre-assembled one is a help.. you'll
need to know how to maintain and repair current designs anyway)


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RGH
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Re: 3D Printer

RGH
Alan - you make a good point regarding Shapeways - but not (IMO) for truly first stage prototyping. Not sure what the turnaround time is but it used to be about 14 days (including postage).

I've found that a lot of what I've designed on OpenSCAD simply doesn't work the way I think it will (particularly with gearing and complex mechanisms etc), so being able to print and test trial models quickly and relatively cheaply is important to me. On the other hand for a "finished product" prototype (if that isn't a tautology), Shapeways offers a lot (such as better finishing, a range of materials etc) that my own printer isn't really up to.


On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 10:37 AM, Alan Cox <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, 21 May 2014 14:11:18 +0100
Derek Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Can anyone recommend a good 3D Printer.
>
> Can the parts to the printer be modelled in OpenSCAD.

Only comments I'd add given this has been answered already:

I spent some time carefully analysing it having part built a printer for
fun when the rest of life interfered. Once I took time and hassle into
account I couldn't make owning a printer beat just using Shapeways, even
for a preassembled printer, even if someone handed me a free rep-rap
style printer.

(Not that for the most part IMHO a pre-assembled one is a help.. you'll
need to know how to maintain and repair current designs anyway)


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Re: 3D Printer

MichaelAtOz
Administrator
I agree, Shapeways is based on volume of material used, there does not seem to be the idea of in-fill which FDM printers use. Thus, for example, a model I print, where I can set in-fill to a low say 25%, it will be mostly air and use little filament ~$2, but to print on Shapeways was ~$50. Shapeways, etc, can produce better finishes, but well tuned home printers are getting pretty good, and turn around is under your control.

I have a printrbot, early version, it is very Reprap, where you need to get your hands dirty, but they also have pre-built models, and the new metal printrbot looks pretty good. They have (now) good customer support and ethics.

I have no experience with others and I'm sure others are good too.
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or if I've done something stupid...
* click on my MichaelAtOz label, there is a link to email me.

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Re: 3D Printer

Kenneth Sloan

Look around.  Shapeways is not the only game in town (although it is one that I 
recommend, if you need what only they can provide).  The alternative is
not always all the way down to “home printer”.  Staples just announced
a service that looks interesting (but I haven’t explored the details).

We provide service to our campus, plus a few local businesses.  We print
primarily FDM (our standard setting is “high density sparse”) and charge
$20 per cubic inch.  Almost exclusively ABS, and the vast majority of
jobs are printed in vanilla “Ivory”.  For local folk, we often provide 1-3 day
turnaround (depending mostly on the size of the job).  [note that the savings
on using a sparse “infill” are somewhat offset by the requirement to use
a support material during printing; our customers pay for both the model material
AND the support material - Shapeways only does “solid” - but you don’t pay for support.
We print many parts that canNOT be 3D printed (in FDM) without soluble support material]

This is not “cheap” - but 1-3 days beats USPS by a large margin.

If you had $X to spend on a “home printer”, you could do a lot of printing
at $20 per cubic inch for the same $X.  And, by then, there may well be
a better printer to buy.  Prices are plummeting - only beware of the
“fly by night” outfits.

One of my favorite “cost saving” stories is a fast prototyping project where
the engineer went through 3 iterations of prototype in ABS before committing
to fabricating the part in aluminum (in a traditional machine shop).  The
prototypes were done on 10-hour turnaround for $150 each.  The aluminum version
took 3 weeks and cost $1000.  Do the math.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 22, 2014, at 16:29 , MichaelAtOz <[hidden email]> wrote:

I agree, Shapeways is based on volume of material used, there does not seem
to be the idea of in-fill which FDM printers use. Thus, for example, a model
I print, where I can set in-fill to a low say 25%, it will be mostly air and
use little filament ~$2, but to print on Shapeways was ~$50. Shapeways, etc,
can produce better finishes, but well tuned home printers are getting pretty
good, and turn around is under your control.

I have a printrbot, early version, it is very Reprap, where you need to get
your hands dirty, but they also have pre-built models, and the new metal
printrbot looks pretty good. They have (now) good customer support and
ethics.

I have no experience with others and I'm sure others are good too.



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Re: 3D Printer

RGH
I think it's great that you open up your service to local businesses.

Unfortunately the major state university in my town is pretty unhelpful and unfriendly to those not on campus or affiliated with the University in some way. (I know that there are local businesses that have great relationships with the University ... but they're all run by graduates of the university. As an out of towner I'm given short shrift.)

As for anywhere else in town ... I'm not in a major metropolitan area (the University is the major employer by a long long way). I am a member of several other lists and I always find it very interesting to note how far apart the perspective is of people that live in or near greater metropolitan areas of say 500,000+ compared with the large number of people that live in "rural cities" of 100,000 or so. At some point the demographics mean that there is a threshold below which a bunch of "niche" services and shops disappears (of course in my town the population is about 125K of which over 50K are students ... so that alters the demographics even more. The nearest "large" city is 2+ hours away.)

It'll be interesting to see what Staples does. I assume it'll be a centralised thing. I personally wouldn't trust any of the local employees to run a 3D printer - they do a poor enough job binding books etc as it is. If it is centralised, I can't see it being any improvement on Shapeways - with the same problems and benefits. I suppose a local shop could afford to install the very expensive Stratasys and 3D systems machines, but from what I have heard (I haven't had any experience myself), they're still pretty finicky to deal with.

I suppose it all depends on what you're using your printer for too. Just out of curiosity I weighed the most recent stuff I've printed (last month or so) - and it comes to about 200 grams, just this month. That's about 166 cubic cm or 10 cubic inches. At $200 for my little things I fear you are still too expensive for me (compared to the cost of a simple FDM printer) - but something that might be worthwhile once I've worked out what will and won't work!


On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 6:29 PM, Kenneth Sloan <[hidden email]> wrote:

Look around.  Shapeways is not the only game in town (although it is one that I 
recommend, if you need what only they can provide).  The alternative is
not always all the way down to “home printer”.  Staples just announced
a service that looks interesting (but I haven’t explored the details).

We provide service to our campus, plus a few local businesses.  We print
primarily FDM (our standard setting is “high density sparse”) and charge
$20 per cubic inch.  Almost exclusively ABS, and the vast majority of
jobs are printed in vanilla “Ivory”.  For local folk, we often provide 1-3 day
turnaround (depending mostly on the size of the job).  [note that the savings
on using a sparse “infill” are somewhat offset by the requirement to use
a support material during printing; our customers pay for both the model material
AND the support material - Shapeways only does “solid” - but you don’t pay for support.
We print many parts that canNOT be 3D printed (in FDM) without soluble support material]

This is not “cheap” - but 1-3 days beats USPS by a large margin.

If you had $X to spend on a “home printer”, you could do a lot of printing
at $20 per cubic inch for the same $X.  And, by then, there may well be
a better printer to buy.  Prices are plummeting - only beware of the
“fly by night” outfits.

One of my favorite “cost saving” stories is a fast prototyping project where
the engineer went through 3 iterations of prototype in ABS before committing
to fabricating the part in aluminum (in a traditional machine shop).  The
prototypes were done on 10-hour turnaround for $150 each.  The aluminum version
took 3 weeks and cost $1000.  Do the math.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 22, 2014, at 16:29 , MichaelAtOz <[hidden email]> wrote:

I agree, Shapeways is based on volume of material used, there does not seem
to be the idea of in-fill which FDM printers use. Thus, for example, a model
I print, where I can set in-fill to a low say 25%, it will be mostly air and
use little filament ~$2, but to print on Shapeways was ~$50. Shapeways, etc,
can produce better finishes, but well tuned home printers are getting pretty
good, and turn around is under your control.

I have a printrbot, early version, it is very Reprap, where you need to get
your hands dirty, but they also have pre-built models, and the new metal
printrbot looks pretty good. They have (now) good customer support and
ethics.

I have no experience with others and I'm sure others are good too.



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Re: 3D Printer

Kenneth Sloan
My understanding is that the “standard Staples setup” will include 2 “hobby level” machines, perhaps
customer operated and 1 “industrial strength” machine run by employees.  I also believe they will
offer a “scan your head and put it on an action figure” service.   Maybe they got the idea from “Big Bang Theory”?

If pressed, I think I could open a store-front service with a moderate-quality, small-build envelope StrataSys printer for under $20k to cover the first year of capital investment and maintenance.  We find these printers to be much more reliable than, say, a hobby-level printer costing $3000.  But, the market changes daily.  If there were enough business to 
support it, I’d very much prefer to have a printer that could do different colors (not necessarily more than 1 color
at a time) AND I would prefer to have multiple printers, for reliability.  My lab has 3 StrataSys printers (plus a Replicator 2 for PLA work - my medical colleagues are not interested in implants made of ABS…)

We also have two scanners (one inexpensive, one NOT) and a couple of computers.  I believe I could replicate this
for under $100k.  Add in renovation costs…and there you are.

The problem with this as a business plan is that you will probably be able to replicate this for under $50k in 2 years.
Also, there’s a limited market for rather boring looking ABS parts.  Engineers and scientists love them - but end-user consumers are not impressed.  For other technologies, my gut feeling is that you would spend as much on “post-processing” (in space, equipment, and expertise) as you do on the 3D printing.

Now…if you want to talk METAL….add a zero, or 2, to the price tag.

I’m going to be very curious to see how the Staples setup works, and how long it lasts.  

--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 22, 2014, at 18:05 , Robert Harris <[hidden email]> wrote:

I think it's great that you open up your service to local businesses.

Unfortunately the major state university in my town is pretty unhelpful and unfriendly to those not on campus or affiliated with the University in some way. (I know that there are local businesses that have great relationships with the University ... but they're all run by graduates of the university. As an out of towner I'm given short shrift.)

As for anywhere else in town ... I'm not in a major metropolitan area (the University is the major employer by a long long way). I am a member of several other lists and I always find it very interesting to note how far apart the perspective is of people that live in or near greater metropolitan areas of say 500,000+ compared with the large number of people that live in "rural cities" of 100,000 or so. At some point the demographics mean that there is a threshold below which a bunch of "niche" services and shops disappears (of course in my town the population is about 125K of which over 50K are students ... so that alters the demographics even more. The nearest "large" city is 2+ hours away.)

It'll be interesting to see what Staples does. I assume it'll be a centralised thing. I personally wouldn't trust any of the local employees to run a 3D printer - they do a poor enough job binding books etc as it is. If it is centralised, I can't see it being any improvement on Shapeways - with the same problems and benefits. I suppose a local shop could afford to install the very expensive Stratasys and 3D systems machines, but from what I have heard (I haven't had any experience myself), they're still pretty finicky to deal with.

I suppose it all depends on what you're using your printer for too. Just out of curiosity I weighed the most recent stuff I've printed (last month or so) - and it comes to about 200 grams, just this month. That's about 166 cubic cm or 10 cubic inches. At $200 for my little things I fear you are still too expensive for me (compared to the cost of a simple FDM printer) - but something that might be worthwhile once I've worked out what will and won't work!


On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 6:29 PM, Kenneth Sloan <[hidden email]> wrote:

Look around.  Shapeways is not the only game in town (although it is one that I 
recommend, if you need what only they can provide).  The alternative is
not always all the way down to “home printer”.  Staples just announced
a service that looks interesting (but I haven’t explored the details).

We provide service to our campus, plus a few local businesses.  We print
primarily FDM (our standard setting is “high density sparse”) and charge
$20 per cubic inch.  Almost exclusively ABS, and the vast majority of
jobs are printed in vanilla “Ivory”.  For local folk, we often provide 1-3 day
turnaround (depending mostly on the size of the job).  [note that the savings
on using a sparse “infill” are somewhat offset by the requirement to use
a support material during printing; our customers pay for both the model material
AND the support material - Shapeways only does “solid” - but you don’t pay for support.
We print many parts that canNOT be 3D printed (in FDM) without soluble support material]

This is not “cheap” - but 1-3 days beats USPS by a large margin.

If you had $X to spend on a “home printer”, you could do a lot of printing
at $20 per cubic inch for the same $X.  And, by then, there may well be
a better printer to buy.  Prices are plummeting - only beware of the
“fly by night” outfits.

One of my favorite “cost saving” stories is a fast prototyping project where
the engineer went through 3 iterations of prototype in ABS before committing
to fabricating the part in aluminum (in a traditional machine shop).  The
prototypes were done on 10-hour turnaround for $150 each.  The aluminum version
took 3 weeks and cost $1000.  Do the math.


--
Kenneth Sloan
[hidden email]


On May 22, 2014, at 16:29 , MichaelAtOz <[hidden email]> wrote:

I agree, Shapeways is based on volume of material used, there does not seem
to be the idea of in-fill which FDM printers use. Thus, for example, a model
I print, where I can set in-fill to a low say 25%, it will be mostly air and
use little filament ~$2, but to print on Shapeways was ~$50. Shapeways, etc,
can produce better finishes, but well tuned home printers are getting pretty
good, and turn around is under your control.

I have a printrbot, early version, it is very Reprap, where you need to get
your hands dirty, but they also have pre-built models, and the new metal
printrbot looks pretty good. They have (now) good customer support and
ethics.

I have no experience with others and I'm sure others are good too.



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Re: 3D Printer

jsc
In reply to this post by RGH
Try makexyz.com. I have not used it, either as a client or a provider. People with printers list their on-demand printing rates. You may find someone in your neighborhood.
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Re: 3D Printer

stonysmith
In reply to this post by MichaelAtOz
>Thus, for example, a model I print, where I can set in-fill to a low say 25%, it will be mostly air and use little filament ~$2, but to print on Shapeways was ~$50.

Very often, the areas which you selected to in-fill will turn out at Shapeways to be solid (filled 100%).  If you can make that same in-fill area truly hollow (with an escape hole to the outside), you can often get the Shapeways price down significantly.

A 25mm cube (one inch) will be $23 in Nylon (WSF) if you make it solid.  It'll be only $5 if you make the walls 0.7mm
12